Got a minute? If you're a busy manager, that's about all you have. That's why Carla Cross, management coach, speaker, and author, has created this blog just for you, with ready-to-use tips to master management through people.

Archive for interviewing

interview with clip boardOnboarding: Is it causing attrition or retention in your company? Do you know? Do you know how awesome (or not) your onboarding system is? Have you done a survey? (more about that in later blogs).

The biggest lesson in the onboarding process is starting each new agent with a proven lead generating plan.

What Does Onboarding Include?

One study I used in Up and Running in 30 Days was the Inman Select Special Report: How to Fix New Agent Onboarding. The Inman report didn’t define what was included in Onboarding. From reading the study, however, Inman included initial training, coaching, and mentoring. I am going to add basic orientation and basic actions to the Onboarding process. Why? Because many real estate companies do not have adequate orientation processes. So, agents don’t get the basic direction needed to launch their businesses.

Question: What is your initial orientation like? Does it cover all the bases? If you want a template and suggestions of what should be included in your orientation, click here.

In this blog, I’ll address the results and its ramifications for real state companies–from the other survey published by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

Retention Starts in the Interview

From working with real estate companies over the past three + decades, I think that most brokers regard retention as something that we must do to keep those seasoned agents. However, according to the survey results in the SHRM study, retention decisions are made by those we hire within a very short period of time. In fact, both studies indicate retention starts prior to hiring!

Here is a major conclusion from this survey, and it what means to real estate companies.

Expectations of the job are different than what new hires heard in the interview. And, the Inman report said new agents fail because they are unprepared for the realities of working as an independent contractor. I’m sure you’ve experienced this. Your new agent is all excited about a career in real estate. But, he/she will not do the lead generating activities required to launch a career. You told the candidate he/she had to lead generate. What is wrong?

Question for you: How well do you explain the job expectations in your interview? Do you provide a prioritized job description for the new agent? (Click here to grab mine). How do you give the prospective agent a real idea of the job?

Three Tips:

  1. Prior to hiring: Have the agent shadow one of your agents who is modeling the behaviors you want.
  2. Provide the agent with the eBook What They Don’t Teach You in Pre-License School. This eBook tells the truth about real estate as a career! You’ll save lots of time in the interview process and winners will pick themselves.
  3. Ask the prospect agent to do an activity you feel is important: Like create a dialogue to talk to someone they know about buying/selling real estate.
  4. Prior to hiring: Give the prospective agent Up and Running in 30 Days. Ask them to review the book. In my experience, if they come back, excited to begin this specific start-up plan, they are a good match for a productivity-focused office. If they come back and reject your lead generating plan, not a good prospect!

In my next blog, I’ll discuss more of the study conclusions and what they mean to us as real estate owners. I’ll also offer tips to tighten your onboarding process. Isn’t it worth having great systems if you could increase your retention of first year agents to 75%?

Last question: What’s your retention rate now of first year agents? How much money do they make their first year in the business? Do you know?

How’s Your Quick-Start Program Working?

Up and Running_5e largerBoth these onboarding studies prove that leaving the new agent’s orientation, training, and start to chance just doesn’t cut it. Take a look at what’s new in Up and Running in 30 Days: updates in 5th edition. This invaluable book is only $32.95 plus shipping, and has been used by thousands of new agents to launch successful careers. Order here.

Recruiting: Here’s what you need in your post-interview package. This month, I’m focusing on recruiting and selecting systems, to help you work faster and better and recruiter winners.

Remember the Chinese water torture? Drip, drip, a drip at a time. That’s the key to recruiting successfully. Here’s another drip you’ll want to provide your candidate after that first interview. This is another package with the information you think the candidate will find useful. Here’s why:

We remember only 10% of what we heard three days later!

Unfortunately, candidates don’t remember much of what we discuss in the interview. Or, they remember it wrongly. It seems easy to us, but, it becomes a muddle to them when they interview five companies in as many days. So, take the time to assemble what I call the after first-visit package or post-interview process. In it, you’ll reiterate important points, and again differentiate yourself and your company.

Systemize Like your Great Agents

Great agents assemble these packages for sellers and buyers. You are modeling the behaviors you want to teach the agent. You can explain the parallels in the interview process. This is a very strong recruiting strategy. The old adages

In Your Post-First Visit (Post-Interview) Package

Here is a sample list of the materials you may include in an after-first visit recruiting package. Note that some of the material is duplicating your pre-first visit package. Also, sometimes you won’t have the opportunity to provide a pre-first visit package. Of course, you’ll always have the ability to customize each package. However, it’s much easier to do this from a prepared package than to start from scratch each time.

Letter from the manager explaining what’s in the package

  •  Training calendar (you do have one, don’t you?)
  • Training brochure
  • Company/office/manager story
  •  Attractive company/office/manager statistics
  •  Articles featuring company/manager
  •  Costs of affiliating  with explanations

Bottom Line: You’ree Proving your Competency to Each Candidate With Every Recruiting Process You Do

Well-assembled packages reflect clear thought processes. Merely putting these together will clarify your recruiting and selection story. It will help you figure out and communicate your culture and values. It will provide you differentiation and memorability. It says to the candidate, I prepared for you. Your time is valuable. I am here to dedicate my skills and talents to help you develop your business.

You will recruit more and better agents, you will save time, and you will be able to delegate or clone yourself by hiring a manager or recruiter when the need arises.

Want to avoid re-inventing the wheel? Check out my recruiting resources here.CompleteRecruiterfor web OBrecuiter

Are you talking too much in the interview?

A lot of recruiters/interviewers think that, if they’re great talkers, they’re great recruiters (same as agents think talking equals selling…..)

You’re a manager who recruits. You want to get winners in that recruiting seat. You pride yourself on being a great talker. (A manager once told me he just talks them to death–until they say they’ll join the company–what a great screening method-not!) But, too much talking is just old-style hard ‘selling’–and that’s certainly not the bulk of an effective selection process.

Ask, Don’t Tell

Probe to find out more. Keep finding out more until you’re really sure you know what they mean. Let me give you an example:

The recruit says, “I want a deal.”

Do you jump to a conclusion because you know what a deal means? Don’t. You may be surprised. Instead, ask questions at what does a deal mean to that recruit? When you know exactly what the recruit means, you can proceed to find what he really wants–instead of what someone else told him he should ask for!

A Pre-Screening Process for New Agent Candidates to Save you Time

Ask these questions before you spend time and money chasing candidates who don’t meet your standards. Click here to get my knockout factors on the phone.

Use In-Depth Questionnaires to Discover Real Needs

Besides using these preliminary questions, always use written in-depth questionnaires so you’ll know

  • The benefits to the features/needs stated
  • Hidden objections you may not discover until too late
  • Motivations to buy that not even the buyers realize they have

Ever heard the term “buyers are liars”? I think that’s not really the case. I think that we don’t ask the right questions to help buyers (our recruits) clarify what they really want. Most ?buyers of services don’t know what they really want. They think they want a better commission split. But, what they’re really looking for is the motivation provided by secrity. That means different things to different people. Find out what’s really motivating your candidate, not just what he says to your basic questions.

Ask the Right Questions in the Right Order and You Won’t Have to Close

Finding the motivators of your buyers (recruit/candidate) is key to helping them make the right buying decisions for themselves. All you have to do to close is to remind them that this product fulfills their needs. And, how do you get there? By creating and using the right questions in the right order.

Don’t forget to grab your pre-screening process–knockout factors to ask on the phone: click here.

Want to streamline your selection process and recruit more winners? Check out Your Blueprint to Selecting Winners. It’s completely digital, so you get all the information right now. Includes an 11-step proven process to interview successfully. Do you have a process or do you just ‘wing it’?

 

What are you looking for–and what aren’t you looking for–in a real estate agent?

This month, I’m featuring recruiting. Why? Because it’s the life blood of real estate success. Unfortunately, too many managers, though, don’t honor it as such.

Knock-Out Factors

First, let’s tackle what you’re not looking for! What are your knock-out factors?

Here are someA�of mine. Grab a pen and write yours. Now, include these as questions in your pre-interview phone questionnaire. (You do have one, don’t you?)

knox-pdf_page_08

(See Your Blueprint for Selecting Winners for a full list of pre-interview questions.

 

 

 

 

 

What ARE You Looking for in a Real Estate Agent?

You’ve listed the knock-out factors that would disqualify the candidate from an interview–or a second interview. Now, let’s look at what you are looking for:

Take a look at the categories below.

knox-pdf_page_09

Now, write the specific skills, talents, and qualities you’re looking for that would add to your team in your office:

 

 

 

 

 

The last question for you in this blog: Do your interview questions reflect what you’re looking for? Write your 3 favorite interview questions and see if they are revealing exactly what you’re looking for. If not, why are you asking them?

In our next blog, I’ll share the best type of interview question you can ask!

blueprint_ebook_cover4Save Time and Recruit the Right People with a great Interview Process

Are you wasting time interviewing and not hiring? Or, interviewing and hiring and then finding out they aren’t a ‘fit’? This resource will help you stop all that and provide laser focus and skills for hiring with confidence.

Check out Your Blueprint for Selecting Winners now–all online for immediate download.

interview with clip boardSelection: If you’re a great talker, your cooked! A lot of recruiters/interviewers think that, if they’re great talkers, they’re great recruiters (same as agents think talking equals selling…..)

You’re a manager who recruits. You want to get winners in that recruiting seat. You pride yourself on being a great talker. (A manager once told me he just talks them to death–until they say they’ll join the company–what a great screening method-not!) A�But, too much talking is just old-style hard ‘selling’–and that’s certainly not the bulk of an effective selection process.

Instead of muscling a sale or a ‘yes’ from a recruita��.ask questions. Lots of questions. Probe to find out more. Keep finding out more until youa��re really sure you know what they mean. Let me give you an example:

The recruitA�says, a�?I want a a�?deala��.a�?

Do you jump to a conclusion because you know what a�?deala�� means? Dona��t. You may be surprised. Instead, ask questions at what a�?deala�� means to that recruit. When you know exactly what the recruit means, you can proceed to find what theA�really wants–instead of what someone else told him he should ask for!

A Pre-Screening Process for New Agent Candidates to Save you Time

Ask these questions before you spend time and money chasing candidates who dona��t meet your standards.A� Click hereA�to get the complete process.

Use In-Depth Questionnaires to Discover Real Needs

Besides using these preliminary questions, always use written in-depth questionnaires so youa��ll know

  • The benefits to the features/needs stated
  • Hidden objections you may not discover until too late
  • Motivations to buy that not even the a�?buyersa�� realizeA�they have

**Ever heard the term a�?buyers are liarsa��? I think thata��s not really the case. I think that we dona��t ask the right questions to help buyers (our recruits)A�clarify what they really want. Most a�?buyersa�� of services dona��t know what they really want. They think they want a better commission split. But, what theya��re really looking for is the motivation provided by secrity. That means different things to different people.A�Find outA�what’s really motivating your candidate, not just what he says to your basic questions.

Ask the Right Questions in the Right Order and You Wona��t Have to a�?Closea��

Finding the motivators of your a�?buyersa�� is key to helping them make the right buying decisions for themselves. All you have to do to a�?closea�� is to remind them that this a�?producta�� fulfills their needs. And, how do you get there? By creating and using the right questions in the right order.

Dona��t forget to grab your pre-screening process:A� click here.

Want to streamline your selection process and recruit more winners? Check out Your Blueprint to Selecting Winners. It’s completely digital, so you get all the information right now. Includes an 11-step proven process to interview successfully. Do you have a process or do you just ‘wing it’?

A�

Thinterview with clip boardis month, I’m featuring information for would-be or new agents. Why? Because although they get lots of information, much of it is slanted by the person offering the advice! (Think ‘interviewer’….). I was just asked to write an article on best advice to a new agent–as though that new agent were my relative.

As an interviewer, my question to you is, “Are you giving unbiased advice? Can you back it up with statistics–proof that what you say works? Read my advice here.

Because I have start-up plans and programs for new agents, Ia��m contacted constantly by new agents wanting advice. The most discouraging thing they tell me (more discouraging to me than them at the beginning) is that they have no one to train or coach them to success. From talking to these agents, I think theya��re vastly underestimating what it takes to get started and be successful. Theya��ve been sold by a nice and well-meaning manager on the thought that joining them and buying a book or going to an easy-in training program will do the trick. And then, when it doesna��t, the agent is out of time and moneya��and ita��s too late for a re-start.

What Did They Tell You about their Training?
My best advice to the would-be and new agent interviewing is to be very, very tough when talking about training expectations. Never accept the phrase that a�?we have traininga��. I have yet to talk to a manager who says they dona��t have training. Yet, when the agents talk to me after being hired, they say there is no or little traininga��.

What Are You Being Coached To?
Be sure the manager (or in-house coach)is going to train and coach you with a business start-up plan, so you know exactly what to do, how to do it, and how to measure it. Without that specific plan, youa��re essentially foundering around trying this and that. And, most importantly, see the programs in writing, so you know theya��re real. And, be discriminating when looking at those programs. Too many of them are cobbled together lovingly (but not professionally) by well-meaning people who arena��t trained as trainers or coaches.

What Results is the Program Getting?
Finally, find out the results of the program. Good programs measure results to assure you that the program works. You deserve this level of expertise to start a successful career.
Here are the questions: Describe your training program. Is it foundationed in a business start-up plan that youa��re going to coach me to? Please let me see your start-up programa��the training, the coaching, and the start-up lan. What are the results?

New agents and managers: What would be your best advice for the serious new agent?

what-they-dont-3d_cover cropped As an interviewer, you need to know what I’m telling your candidates!

Take a look at the five most important questions you should ask your interviewera��and how to evaluate the answers, in What They Dona��t Teach You in Pre-License School.

This blog is excerpted from my new eBook, What They Don’t Teach You in Pre-License School.A�

As managers, I want you to know the advice I’m giving to prospective agents.

coachingAs youa��re interviewing, you may be offered these things:

  • An accountability coach (the manager or a professional coach affiliated with that office)
  • A peer coach
  • Become a team member
  • Become an assistant

In this blog, we’ll tackle the pros and cons of getting a coach or a mentor.

What about Getting a Coach?

I hope your manager will become your accountability coach. But, many managers promise to a�?coach youa��. However, that quickly becomes a a�?got a minutea�� answer man function instead of a focused, linear, goal-oriented action coaching. You dona��t need a coach just for answers. You need a coach to hold you accountable to your goals and action plan.

Choosing a Coach

Here are three important points you should consider as you search for a coach:

  1. The specific program should be highly organized and precisely outA�lined with checklists and systems. Ask, a�?What system are you going to use to coach me?a�? You need a specific game plan, because you are new. You have no history.
  2. The specific program should be related to a a�?game plana�?a��a busiA�ness start-up plan. Ask, a�?What game plan are you going to use?a�?
  3. The coaches should be trained and coached themselves. Ask, a�?Whata��s your coaching background, and what sales principles do you believe in?a�? For example, each of our coaches in the Carla Cross Coaching program has been trained by me and coached regularly by me.

A�Positives: Having a coach keeps you on track, motivated, and, ideA�ally, inspired to reach your goals.

Watch out for: Your coach is trained and dedicated to your success, and is following a proven game plan (otherwise youa��ll be paying just to talk to someone every once in a while).

Types of Coaches

Professional coach: Someone trained to coach, who uses a specific program and who is paid to be your coach. If youa��re considering a professional coach, find out the specific program the coach will use to coach you. Get expectations in writing, and give your expectations in writing. You should expect to sign a 3-12 month contract.

Manager coach or in-office coach: Someone who may be trained as a coach, who has agreed to coach you. May be paid from your commissions or from a combination of office/your commissions. May be paid on an hourly based by the agent. Be sure this coach is prepared to be your accountability coach, has a specific schedule with you, and a specific start-up plan to coach you. Otherwise, youa��re just getting an a�?advice sessiona��.

Peer coach: Someone in the office, an agent, who has agreed to be your coach. However, this could be anything from

  • A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A� Answer questions
  • A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A� Let you a�?shadow thema�� (see how they do a listing/buyer presentation or offer presentation)
  • A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A� Be your accountability coach

Most peer coaches dona��t have a coaching program to coach to, and havena��t been trained. They are also at a loss with what to do if the agent refuses to do the work.

In my experience, the agent has the highest hopes that the peer coach will fulfill his dreams of whatever coaching is to him. The peer coach is hoping the agent just doesna��t ask too many questions!

If youa��re going to work with a peer coach, get in writing exactly what that peer coach is willing to do with and for you. Bad peer coaching can turn into a nightmarea��for both parties.

Agentsa�� advice: Dozens of experienced agents have told me they wish they had started with a professional coach. If you can find one to trusta��and to followa��youa��ll shorten your learning curve dramatically and easily pay for the coaching fee. Plus, youa��ll establish a successful long-term career.

Next, wea��ll discuss three a�?safety-netsa�� that some new agents considera��because theya��re afraid they will not be able to generate enough commissions by relying solely on their own work.

Getting a Mentor

What is a a�?mentora��? Therea��s not a clearly defined job function. Mentors are usually seasoned agents who offer to help new agents. They may

  • A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A� Offer advice
  • A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A� Allow you to shadow them
  • A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A� Ask you to do parts of their business

New agents love the thought of a mentor, because they have so many questions. And, they think the mentor will be their a�?answer mana��. But, Ia��ve observed that having an a�?answer mana�� surely doesna��t guarantee success. In fact, it may impede an agent getting into action. How? An agent may think he needs more and more information before he will act. Then, he just keeps coming to the mentor for every question under the sun. And, the more the new agent knows, the more frightened he becomes. Plus, the advice received from the mentor may not be in the new agenta��s best interest.

If you are considering a mentor, get in writing exactly what the mentor will do for you.

Big question: Why is the mentor willing to help you? What does the mentor expect from you?

Treat getting a coach or a mentor as an employment issue. Create good questions and interview. Armed with the advice above, you’ll make a good decision.

Managers: How would you address the concerns above?

 

man talking to womanYou know the questions you want to ask the candidate. But, what questions should they ask you? I just finished my new eBook, What They Dona��t Teach You in Pre-License School, and I’m giving prospective and new agents all the answers to all the questions I can think of–that they ask during their pre-and post-license ‘life’. So, Here are the most important questions I believe they should ask you. I’ve also included the advice I provide the candidates. How would you answer them?

1. What are your minimum production expectations for agents in their first 3 months? 6 months? 1 year?

This question will tell you whether youa��re considering joining a company/office of focused, career-minded professionals, or a company/office of part-timers, low producers, and those who just want to snag a couple of sales. If the manager has no minimum expectations, he/she willing to hire anyone to a�?give them a chance.a�� Thata��s not a business, ita��s an opportunity to create an avocation.

2. How are you going to help me launch my career? Describe your start-up program and schedule for mea��orientation, training, and business start-up plan. (*Ask to see the specifics of the programs).

A�You would be amazed at how many real estate offices do not have an orientation resource or process for you! Without these systems and processes, though, new agents have no way to find out where the files are, how to get the various keys, codes, and operations associated with the office, the Multiple Listing Services, and the National Association of RealtorsA� information. Lack of these checklists and systems indicates that the manager either doesna��t care much about the quick success of the new agent and/or that he or she doesna��t hire many new agents.

3. What kind of results does your start-up plan and initial training gain for your new agents? How many transactions are they doing, on average, by month three? (Ask to see the statistics).

You shouldna��t be concerned if therea��s one (or more) top producer in the office. That may have little to do with your own success. You should be concerned with the programs and strategies that manager is going to implement to assure you reach your goals (and the office minimums) in your time frame.

4. Coaching and Accountability: Who will be coaching me to the start-up plan? How will I be held accountable?

Who will coach you in your first few weeks/months about the activities to assure youa��re on track to quick success? How often? What will the coach use as a game plan? (It should be your business start-up plan!) Whata��s the cost? Is the coach trained as a coach? What support and ongoing training and monitoring do the coaches have? Talk to a newer agent in that office who has been coached, too. If therea��s no formal, scheduled coaching and no or little accountability, you are on your own to figure out how to sell real estate!

5. What other specific support will assure I am successful fast?

Listen carefully to this answer. Is it a a�?branding speecha�� to sell you the benefits of that particular company, or does it focus on helping you individually reach your goals? If the interviewer mentions support services such as peer coaching, delve deeper to find out what specific services are provided.

What do you think are the most important questions an agent should ask?

what-they-dont-3d_coverSave Time; Inform and Educate Candidates

Having interviewed thousands of potential agents, I know the hours it can take to educate and answer all their questions. But, what you really want to do in the interview is ASK questions and show the benefits of your company, your office, and you. Now, you can save thousands of hours by providing this new eBook, with answers to the dozens of questions new agent candidates ask.

This is theA�one book you need to answer all your pre-license and post-license questions. There is no other real estate book that covers this ground!

Introductory price: Order NOW and get $5 off this eBook, PLUS 30 Things to Do Right Now to Hit The Ground Running (while you’re in pre-license school). This is great to give to your interviewees, too, to get them ready to sell lots of real estate!

Now $19.95 for a limited time.

Inside:

  • How to decide if real estate is the right career for you
  • How to determinate absolutely if youa��re a a�?salespersona�� type and will love selling real estate
  • What they dona��t tell you to do during pre-license –to hit the ground running
  • The 5 most important interview questions to ask to choose the right situation for you
  • The technology you need your first day in the office
  • Plus, answers to 100 other a�?new agenta�� questions

Sure. There are lots of books on how to sell real estate. But, therea��s no other book that gives you advice and guidance before you commit to real estate as a career. Thata��sA�What They Don’t Teach You reveals. Plus, this book gives you guidance from your first week in the business through your first few months in the business.

Managers: Also get dozens of ideas for a great Career Night! Order here.

Are we preparing new agents for reality–or a reality show? If I knew then what I know now……how many times have we said that about relationships, cars, homes–orA�real estate? The same might be said by real estate agents!

What do you want prospective agents to know prior to entering real estate? What should they be prepared for in the business?

I’m in the midst, right now, of doing 2 things that will provide ‘reality’ for new agents.

1. I’m creating the online version of Up and Running in 30 Days–but I’m expanding it to 8 weeks with lots of detail, processes, how-tos, teaching, and coaching (plus coaching for the coaches!) See more below.

2. I’m writing a new book for prospective/new real estate agents: What They Don’t Teach You in Pre-License School (out in about 2 months).

My concern is that we’re informing new agents about reality–not painting real estate sales as a picture from a reality show!

SometimesA�Our CandidatesA�Hear It, ButA�They Don’t Listen

Sometimes, I find that the agent has been told the bold truth in the interview, but really didn’t listen, believe it, or take it to heart. What are some of those things youA�tell candidatesA�but they don’t grasp or believe? What could have madeA�them believeA�you?(I’ll be sure to state these the best way I can, to help others get the right kind of guidance starting their careers).

If It Sounded Too Good in the Interview….

From interviewing hundreds of would-be agents, I know the things they’re told in interview that sound wonderful–and turn out not to be true. Examples:

You won’t have to prospect with us. We’ll give you all the leads. (Really? But, what’s the quality of those leads, and what do you have to do after you get the lead? Are they ready to buy? )

We have great floor time. (Really? If so, why aren’t all the agents in the office selling 40-50 homes a year?)

You’ll get lots of re-lo leads. (Why? What’s the work you have to do with those leads?)

You’ll do great with us. (Sounds like you’re really exceptional and all those other agents in the office aren’t….)

We’re the biggest. you have to be with us to succeed. (So, everyone with you succeeds?)

What Should the Candidate Be Wary of in the Interview?

What do you end up telling the candidate to help him make the right decision about entering real estate?

Thanks for contributing to the success of others in the industry. It strengthens us all and helps clients regard us with respect.

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Get Your Agent a Scholarship for the new Up and Running in Real Estate Program

In a week, I’m launching a scholarship program to award 3 new (under 2 years) agents a full scholarship to my new Up and Running in Real Estate program. To find out details, check out my Facebook business page, ‘like’ it, and have your agent complete the scholarship application. I want to kick off the program with worthy agent who will benefit–and make a lot more money as a result!A� Scholarship details available May 5.

By the way, you’ll receive a full scholarship, too, as that agent’s coach, and get entry into the Coaches’ Corner.

How can agents get the best from managers? I know agents sit in the interview and askedA�managers, “What are you going to do for me?” But, did the manager ask the agent, “What are you going to do for me?”

From working as an agent for 8 years, and managing agents for almost two decades, Ia��ve drawn some conclusions about the a�?turnabouta��s fair playa�� that I believe agents owe managers. Ia��ve also listed these in the new Up and Running in 30 Days, because, I believe if managers are willing to give 100% support through training and coaching each agent to success, agents need to give it their best, too. Here are my agentsa�� ten commandments:

  1. Do the work.
  2. Dona��t argue.
  3. Dona��t make excuses form not doing your start-up plan.
  4. Dona��t tell the manager youa��ve been in the business two weeks and you have a better way.
  5. Do thank your manager frequently.
  6. Do tell other agents that you appreciate your managera��s efforts.
  7. Do tell other new agents you meet in other companies that you have a great manager.
  8. Dona��t bug other people in the office to find another answer because you didna��t like your managera��s answer.
  9. Dona��t change the Up and Running plan because you a�?dona��t like ita�?. (You just dona��t like lead generating, do you
  10. Dona��t miss a coaching appointment!

Ia��d love to hear what you think of my a�?ten commandments.a�� Are there others you think are important?

Why not make your own ten commandments and discuss them in your interview process with your candidates.

Agents: Before you hire on, get in writing exactly what your manager is going to do to assure your success, so you wona��t have disappointments later. Getting agreement on what we both expect before we decide to work together is key to a happy partnership. The only surprises I want you and your agent to have after you start working together are good ones!

Win a Copy of My New Book

Would you like to win a copy of my new 4th edition of Up and Running in 30 Days, the new agent’s start-up plan? It’s not even on the shelves yet. Just go to my Facebook business page and enter the contest (win a book).