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Rate yourself on your management skills, so you’ll know what you need to work on prior to going into management (or if you’re already in management).

Are you thinking of going into management? Few of us knew the skills–or the level of skill attainment–we needed to succeed in the job. I want to help all of you who want to go into management to succeed at a high level. Thus, these blogs.

For the past couple of months, I’ve been interviewing potential managers. I’ve found that almost none had done any ‘prep’ work to go into the position. Yet, successful managers have developed specific, somewhat unique skills to do their jobs. And, what I’ve found is that these skills must be at least partially developed before we launch ourselves into management–or else we get swamped by all these new challenges hitting us in the face!

In an earlier blog, I discussed the skills we need to have honed prior to going into management. In this blog, we’ll tackle getting those skills in certain areas.

At the end of this blog: grab my assessment tool I use in my Leadership Mastery coaching series to help new managers plan for this skill attainment.

The Biggest Skill Area Managers Need Today to Succeed

What do you think it is? It’s recruiting and selecting skill. Why? Because, there’s so much competition for good agents that a manager just can’t sit back and wait for agents to come to them. It isn’t the old days (although I never was able to do that in my ‘old days!’).

These skills are the same skills good agents use to expand their businesses. That’s why we need to hire managers who have been successful recruiters and selectors. Notice I said recruiters and selectors. I know companies brag about how mahy gross recruits they landed that month or year, but, long-term, it’s those who stay, prosper, and grow with the company that add to the profitability of all.

One of the standards you need to create when you’re hiring a manager is

How successful was that agent as a business getter? What’s the number of transactions you would accept?

How to Get Recruiting and Selecting Skills

Your company may have a course focusing on these skills. If so, take it prior to going into management. Overall, the best courses out there for management are the CRB courses, leading to the Certified Real Estate Broker designation. I highly recommend them. Here’s the link.

What’s Your Agent Track Record?

In addition, if you don’t have a track record of at least 12-20 transactions a year as an agent, in my opinion, you have not developed the skills in recruiting and selecting you will need as a successful agent. It’s my experience that agents who didn’t actively lead generate will carry that habit into management. They will balk at lead generating for agents, and they will fight upper management to the death–and to everyone’s detriment.

Resource (Some are FREE) to Gain those Management Skills

This month, I’m offering some of my management resources free with purchase of other resources. Check it out here.

Grab the leadership skill assessment here.

Managers or general managers: If you’re hiring a new manager, help them evaluate their skill levels and then create a training and coaching program to assure they get those skills before they launch their management career.

Here are benefits and downsides of joining a team–from a new agent’s perspective. As you read below, ask yourself, “How well do my leaders of teams meet the criteria? How well are they leading their teams? Is it a benefit for one of my new agents to join a particular team?

This blog is excerpted from my ebook, What They Don’t Teach You in Pre-License School.A�A�

I wrote this eBook to save prospective agents and managers time during the interview/selecction process. Here’s an excerpt from the eBook, where I discuss teams–the good and the negatives–for new agents.

Joining a TeamA�

As you interview, you may be invited to join an office team. That means youa��ll be essentially working for a a�?rainmakera��, a lead agent who generates a�?leadsa�� for those on his team. Of course, those leads cost money, and the rainmaker takes about half the income from the team member for the lead generation and other services.

Teaming helps agents obtain leads as they start up business. While agents earn the most in commission dollars when they generate their leads themselves, a new agent may need to pay for someone elsea��s lead generation to begin to develop business. There is a downside to this approach, howA�ever. Agents can become complacent and sit and wait for leads. They wona��t generatea��until they get tired of paying for someone elsea��s leads.

A�Positives: You may be able to jump-start your career with leads given to you.

A�What to Watch For

  • Sit in on her team meeting to see how she manages the team.
  • Find out if and how the rainA�maker will train you.
  • Find out how much turnover there has been on the team.
  • Find out whether you can sell and list houses outside the teama��and how much the rainmaker would charge you if you did.
  • Read the contract the rainmaker asks you to sign and be sure you understand the consequences of your involvement.
  • Evaluate how good a leader that rainmaker is. Some rainmakers are great salespeople, but lousy leaders, and so their team never a�?jellsa��.

Generate your Own Leads, too?

Most team leaders ultimately expect their team members to generate their own leads, in addition to team leads. If you cana��t meet the rainmakera��s expectations, you are terminated. Be willing and ready to take the responsibilities of team member seriously.

Are You Helping Candidates Make the Best Business Decision for Them?

If you’re interviewing tons of prospective agents, you’re spending lots of time at it. Why not let Carla answer some of the most important new agent questions–and free you up to do a real interview? Check outA�my ebook, What They Don’t Teach You in Pre-License School.A�

You’ll save lots of interview time and help the winners choose you!

3 men and women working at tableTrend: Teaming–advantages and disadvantages.

These trends are from my new 5th edition of Up and Running in 30 Days.

This month, I’m featuring excerpts from this book. As a manager, read the thoughts on teaming and ask yourself, “Am I supporting teaming? Do I have enough control over my teams?”

{Click here to see the updates in my fifth edition of Up and Running in 30 Days.}

What is ‘teaming’?

It is affiliating yourself with a a�?rainmakera�? agent, an agent who will deliver leads to you, for which youa��ll pay a portion of your commission. Youa��re teaming up with that agent to do the work that the rainmaker agent doesna��t have time to do. First, teaming doesna��t mean partneringa��two agents working together. If you join a team, you are working for that rainmaker agent.

Generally, agents who grow teams have been in the business at least a few years. Theya��ve developed a large business. To grow their businesses, they need to a�?duplicate and delegate.a�? So they hire assistants and buyersa�� agentsa��agents who work with buyers the rainmaker agent has generated. Many times they hire new agents and train them in their methods.

How Joining a Team Can Help a New Agent

Teaming helps agents obtain leads as they start up business. While agents earn the most in commission dollars when they generate their leads themselves, a new agent may need to pay for someone elsea��s lead generation to begin to develop business. There is a downside to this approach, however. Agents can become complacent and sit and wait for leads. They wona��t generatea��until they get tired of paying for someone elsea��s leads.

Questions to Ask the Rainmaker1.A� How many leads will I get per week?2.A� How do you manage the team?

3.A� How will you train me?

4.A� How much turnover has the team had?

5.A� Can I sell homes from my own leads, and what will you charge me?

6. Do you expect me to generate my own leads? How many?

Positives of teaming:

  • You may be able to jump-start your career with leads given to you.

Watch out for:

  • Be careful to choose a rainmaker who really has enough good leads to distribute to you.
  • Sit in on her team meeting to see how she manages the team.
  • Find out if and how the rainmaker will train you. Find out how much turnover there has been on the team.
  • Find out whether you can sell and list houses outside the teama��and how much the rainmaker would charge you if you did.
  • Read the contract the rainmaker asks you to sign and be sure you understand the consequences of your involvement.

Is he or she a leader?

Evaluate how good a leader that rainmaker is. Some rainmakers are great salespeople but lousy leaders, and so their team never gels. Most team leaders ultimately expect their team members to generate their own leads, in addition to team leads. If you cana��t meet the rainmakera��s expectations, you are terminated. Be willing and ready to take the responsibilities of team membership seriously.

* Big Idea: If they arena��t your leads, youa��re starting the real estate business all over again when you leave the team.

Question: Have you thought about joining a team? Or, if you joined a team, how did it work out?

Up and Running_5e largerAre You Using the Best Start-Up Plan for your New Agents?

Does your plan have the detailed, prioritized checklists needed to assure a great start? Does it have built-in inspiration and motivation? Does it have dozens of tips to control the attitude? If not, you need Up and Running in 30 Days. Just out in its 5th edition, it’s the most successful book for new real estate agents ever!

Click here to see the updates in my fifth edition of Up and Running in 30 Days.

time management guy with clockManagers: Are you systemized–or, is your office piles of papers–that you can’t find when you need them? Are your systems up to speed? On a scale of 1 to 10, ten being high, how would you rate your organization and your systems? Do you seem to be grabbing at papers right before your recruiting appointment? Do you find yourself sketching a training outline five minutes prior to the training start time? If so, youa��ll want to take some time to a�?systematizea�? yourself. Why?

Save time

Get more done

Lower your stress levels

Enjoy your job more

(See the end of this blog for a link to systems you need in place).

Why do Managers Need Systems?

Good agents today have systems for each process they manage. For example, an agent has a listing process system, which includes the materials, packages, and checklists to manage the process. With those systems, agents can not only the manage the process, they can delegate the right activities to their assistants. (See my blog link at the end of this blog for systems agents need).

Managers Dona��t Have Nearly the Systems Agents Have

Think about the systems, processes, and checklists you, as manager, recommend that your agent create to accomplish the critical tasks, or activities, in his business. Now, compare that with the tasks you, as manager, have to accomplish in your position as “people” manager. Work from the tasks to systems to manage these tasks. To prioritize the systems you want to develop, first:

1. List the tasks you do as manager. Now, list the parallel the tasks agents do.

An example: A critical task an agent does is to prospect. Good agents have systematized that process into a marketing plan, complete with specific tactics, dates, and budget. Managers must prospect, too. They prospect for agents.

Does your prospecting (recruiting) plan for agents resemble that of your best agent’s marketing plan? Is it as systematized? Does it have the materials, time frames, budgets, and delegations that good agents have in their plans?

2. Prioritize your tasks as they relate to accomplishing your main objectives. What are the most important tasks you do as manager to assure your office makes a profit?

An example: If recruiting is very important to reaching your objective, how complete is your recruiting system? How organized is it? Who is involved with you in your recruiting plan? How well are you delegating the systems?

Your Job Description Comes First

Developing systems first requires that you’ve prioritized your job description. (Wait: Do you have a job description?) Then, you must either create or purchase systems to manage these processes. One reason managers haven’t systematized their work is that managers have few resources for systems organization. To actually systematize their work, they must create these systems from scratch. Given the myriad of activities managers must accomplish, that’s a daunting assignment. Instead, many managers stay in “crisis” management, which admittedly takes up a lot of the day, but doesn’t allow the manager to move ahead as a leader.

In contrast, agents have many resources for systems organization, both purchased and exchanged with other agents. First, there are many more agents than managers, and agents coming into the business each day. So, there is a larger market, and need, for agents’ systems. In addition, agents have led the way in organizing their businesses to delegate to assistants. It’s become ‘the thing’ to do.

Resource List of Needed Systems

Click onA�Managers Package and SystematizeA�for a list of systems and process you need to manage your business with grace and lower your stress level.

Want to know what systems your agents need? Read my blog on systems for agents.

LM Cover

Let Me Help you Get your Systems in Place–and How to Use Them

It would take you years to create the systems I’ve already created–and are available in my one-on-one leadership coaching program, Leadership Mastery Coaching. If you’re tired of working too hard for too little pay-off, why not do a complimentary consultation and see how Leadership Mastery can benefit you? Click here to schedule your 1/2 hour appointment.

beatles youngWhat in the world do the Beatles have to do with real estate pros success? A lot, I think. Wea��ve all heard of Paul, George, Ringo, and Johna��but, does the name a�?George Martina�? ring a bell? Maybe. Martin was the record producer who discovered and molded the Beatles, adding his classical musical background to the Beatlesa�� creativity to produce the Beatlesa�� unique and ever evolving sounds.

As a musician myself, Ia��ve always marveled at how the Beatles put classical musical aspects into their rock a�?n roll. Well, guess what? They didna��t do it by themselvesa��they melded their talents with Martin. George Martin just died at age 90, and many articles are being written about his collaboration with the Beatles. As I read these articles, I was thinking, a�?These life and performance lessons are absolutely applicable to us real estate professionals.a�? So, I culled five life and performance lessons we can learn from their association. Here are the first two, and I’ll continue in my next blog.

  1. Keep improving your team until you are working with the best.

Martin urged Beatlesa�� manager Brian Epstein to replace drummer Pete Best with Ringo Starr, who he felt was a better drummer. Is your team the strongest it can be? Whoa��s holding you back? Whoa��s hindering your best performance? Who do you need to replace? I know, as an ensemble musician, you never play any better than your worst player!A�

  1. Start every listing, buyer and training presentation with an attention-getting a�?hooka��.

Quit that boring droning that begins most presentations! Instead, do what Martin suggested: Start with a ‘hook’. A� Martin suggested Paul McCartney replace the first verse of Cana��t Buy Me Love with the a�?cana��t buy me lovea�� intro. Thata��s the hook, and we never forget it, do we? Do your listing/buyer and training presentations start with something attention-getting, or do you a�?ease intoa�� your presentation with banal comments like a�?Ia��ll keep this shorta�� or a�?wea��ve got a lot to covera��. Stop being banal and get creative with your opening (we practice this in my Instructor Development Workshop and I teach this in The Ultimate Real Estate Trainera��s Guide).

Applying these Principles with your Agents

Are you working with the best people? If not, why not? What do you need to do with your recruiting, selecting, and retention to upgrade your team so you all do better?

LM CoverWho’s On your Side? Who’s Supporting You?

Owners and managers: Are you as profitable as you deserve to be? If youa��re selling AND managing, youa��re finding yourself going 6 ways to Sunday! If youa��re not satisfied with your results, considerA�Leadership Mastery coaching with Carla Cross. This is not a a�?cookie cuttera�� program. This is a completely customized owner/manager program focusing on recruiting, coaching, training, leadership, delegation, and staff management. Why not hone your skills with Carla as your guide and support? Get your best sources of recruits, a great recruiting plan, AND a failsafe selection process to pick winners.

Sign up for a Complimentary Consultation to see if Leadership Mastery would benefit you. What do you have to lose?

Bonus for new coaching clients this month: $1000+ of Carla Crossa��s recruiting, training, and coaching resources FREE ! Includes:

The Complete Recruiter, at $129.95 valuea��the strategies, planner, and dialogues you need to recruit winners

Your Blueprint for Selecting Winners, a complete interviewing guide, a $79.95 valuea��free.

Recruiting Objection Busters, scripts and dialogues to counter the toughest recruiting objections, a $40 value

Business Planning for the Owner, Manager, and Team Builder,a $100 value

Operations/Orientation Manuals and Checklists, a $30 value

Coaching Companions to coach new or experienced agents, a $200 value

Advantage 2.0 facilitator guide, a complete training program (a $500 value)

Click here to learn more about Leadership Mastery Coaching.

Click here to schedule a complimentary consultation to find out more about the program, ask questions, and see if ita��s a a�?matcha��. After your consultation, youa��ll receive a a�?thank youa�� of a 2-pack management audio CD series.

 

 

<p><a href=”https://getarealestatecoach.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/leadership-elements-qualities-25801327.jpg”><img class=”alignleft size-medium wp-image-3525″ src=”https://getarealestatecoach.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/leadership-elements-qualities-25801327-300×246.jpg” alt=”http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photography-leadership-elements-qualities-image25801327″ width=”300″ height=”246″ /></a>This month, I’m featuring the topic ‘leadership’. Why? Because it’s one of the biggest real estate industry trends (and probably world trends) of today and beyond. Look for leadership strategies and trends (not just in the real estate industry), plus ready-to-use documents to go from ‘maintenance management’ to leadership.</p>
<p><strong>Is your leadership style ‘tell them what to do and expect them to do it’? </strong>It seems so easy. Youa��re the chairperson or manager. Just take charge, tell people what to do, and theya��ll do it. NOT. Ita��s just not that simple. At least, ita��s not that simple unless systems are already in place and peopleA� know what their tasks are.</p>
<p><strong>Seven Truisms about Effective Participative LeadershipA�</strong></p>
<p>It’s not enough today to be good at a traditional leadership style. In fact, you have to really ‘turn your leadership style’ upside down to become effective. You must become a ‘participative’ leader. What is a ‘participative’ leader? One who coordinates, facilitates, and encourages input and collaboration.</p>
<p>Here are seven truisms to help you flex your natural style toward more participation from your team members.</p>
<p><em>Truism #1: New chair people don’t know what’s expected of them</em></p>
<p>Just because people accept the title it doesn’t mean they know how to proceed with the job. Most people have never chaired a committee, so they don’t have the skills. It’s especially challenging when it’s a new task. They need to have clear direction, a job description, job responsibilities, and exactly who to go to when the job doesn’t get done.</p>
<p><em>Truism #2: People don’t know HOW to get it doneA�</em></p>
<p>Even when people know what to do, they don’t usually have checklists, systems, deadlines, and assignments to get it done; it doesn’t work to leave it to a person (95% of the time, the other 5% will figure it out on their own) to decide how to get the job done.</p>
<p><em>Truism #3: Myth: “Leaders are theA� “idea people” and arena��t supposed to get into implementation (someone else will figure out how to get the work done)</em></p>
<p>When leaders say that, they immediately put others into the a�?secretarya�? mode. Their mentality is, someone else beneath them should be able to figure out how to get that done. Thata��s a secretarial or assistanta��s job, isna��t it? But, your committee members dona��t work for you. They work with you. You cana��t expect someone to raise his hand and offer to be your assistant because you came up with the idea.</p>
<p><em>Truism #4: Verbal-type people resist processes and systems</em></p>
<p>There is a natural resistance in us (maybe especially in we verbal-type people) to organizing processes and systems. We love to talk about the idea. We don’t like to clarify exactly how that idea gets into process.</p>
<p><em>Truism #5: We ‘big idea’ people think we can delegate systems design to an assistantA�A� </em></p>
<p>Having worked with assistants for over 15 years, I have found that not true. Assistants need help in systematizing any process that YOU want done. They are good at systematizing their own processes–but not good at all at systematizing ours!</p>
<p><em>Truism #6: Leaders know committees take most of their time REPORTING to the larger group, not deciding on issues or processes</em></p>
<p>A mistake that committees make is to try to design processes within the large committee meeting. Instead, create task forces to report back quickly to you.</p>
<p><em>Truism #7: When accountability factors aren’t built in, things don’t get done.</em></p>
<p>This is a dicey issue, because you’re working with volunteers. Or, in the case of a real estate company, with independent contractors. At the same time, your association or business also expects the services and programs you promised. There’s a great difference between “do it the way you want” and expecting results and “do it the way you want” and let’s check how it’s going regularly.</p>
<p><strong>Sharpening Your Participative Leadership Skills</strong></p>
<p>What truisms do you want to add from your experiences in leadership? What do you see of yourself in these truisms? How can these help you lead? What needs to be done inA� your leadership position to gain greater skills? These skills are learned over time, and the pay-off is an association or business that is a�?owneda�� by all those involved, with empowerment assured.</p>
<h2><a href=”https://getarealestatecoach.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/LM-Cover.jpg”><img class=”alignleft size-medium wp-image-3455″ src=”https://getarealestatecoach.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/LM-Cover-286×300.jpg” alt=”LM Cover” width=”286″ height=”300″ /></a>Support for New Leadership Strategies</h2>
<p>We hear so many great ideas–but, when it comes to implementing them, they seem difficult or distant. And, it’s hard for us to have confidence in our ability to implement. Why not get the support you need to step ahead and lead your office or company to greatness? Your first step is simple, free, and will be informative. Request a ‘complimentary consultation’ to see how Carla’s unique one-on-one coaching program works, and how it may be able to help you get ahead faster and with more confidence. <a href=”http://carla-cross.com/coaching/complimentary-consultation/” target=”_blank”><strong>Click here</strong> </a>for more information and request. Read more about Leadership Mastery Coaching <a href=”http://carla-cross.com/coaching/leadership-mastery-coaching/” target=”_blank”><strong>here.</strong></a></p>

Sep
09

7 Leadership Truisms to Lead By

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This month, I’m featuring the topic ‘leadership’. Why? Because new leadership styles are one of the biggest real estate industry trends (and probably world trends) of this decade and beyond. Look for leadership strategies and trends (not just in the real estate industry), plus ready-to-use documents to go from ‘maintenance management’ to leadership. Also: more agents are forming a company within a company, to build their brand, their team, and expand to other markets. The minute an agent hires an assistant, he/she goes into management and must exhibit leadership skills. What a challenge!

Is your leadership style ‘tell them what to do and expect them to do it’? It seems so easy. Youa��re the chairperson or manager. Just take charge, tell people what to do, and theya��ll do it. NOT. Ita��s just not that simple. At least, ita��s not that simple unless systems are already in place and people on the committee know what their tasks are.

Seven Truisms about Effective Participative LeadershipA�

It’s not enough today to be good at a traditional leadership style. In fact, you have to really ‘turn your leadership style’ upside down to become effective. You must become a ‘participative’ leader. Here are seven truisms to help you flex your natural style toward more participation from your team members.

Truism #1: New chairpeople don’t know what’s expected of them

Just because people accept the title it doesn’t mean they know how to proceed with the job. Most people have never chaired a committee, so they don’t have the skills. It’s especially challenging when it’s a new task. They need to have clear direction, a job description, job responsibilities, and exactly who to go to when the job doesn’t get done.

Truism #2: People don’t know HOW to get it doneA�

Even when people know what to do, they don’t usually have checklists, systems, deadlines, and assignments to get it done; it doesn’t work to leave it to a person (95% of the time, the other 5% will figure it out on their own) to decide how to get the job done.

Truism #3: Myth: “Leaders are theA� “idea people” and arena��t supposed to get into implementation (someone else will figure out how to get the work done)

When leaders say that, they immediately put others into the a�?secretarya�? mode. Their mentality is, someone else beneath them should be able to figure out how to get that done. Thata��s a secretarial or assistanta��s job, isna��t it? But, your committee members dona��t work for you. They work with you. You cana��t expect someone to raise his hand and offer to be your assistant because you came up with the idea.

Truism #4: Verbal-type people resist processes and systems

There is a natural resistance in us (maybe especially in we verbal-type people) to organizing processes and systems. We love to talk about the idea. We don’t like to clarify exactly how that idea gets into process.

Truism #5: We ‘big idea’ people think we can delegate systemization to an assistantA�A�

Having worked with assistants for over 15 years, I have found that not true. Assistants need help in systemizing any process that YOU want done. They are good at systemizing their own processes–but not good at all at systemizing ours!

Truism #6: Leaders know committees take most of their time REPORTING to the larger group, not deciding on issues or processes

A mistake that committees make is to try to design processes within the large committee meeting. Instead, create task forces to report back quickly to you.

Truism #7: When accountability factors aren’t built in, things don’t get done.

This is a dicey issue, because you’re working with volunteers. Or, in the case of a real estate company, with independent contractors. At the same time, your association or business also expects the services and programs you promised. There’s a great difference between “do it the way you want” and expecting results and “do it the way you want” and let’s check how it’s going regularly.

Sharpening Your Participative Leadership Skills

What truisms do you want to add from your experiences in leadership? What do you see of yourself in these truisms? How can these help you lead? What needs to be done inA� your leadership position to gain greater skills? These skills are learned over time, and the pay-off is an association or business that is a�?owneda�� by all those involved, with empowerment assured.

Starting in January: A Leadership By the Month Coaching Series

small 365_leadership_logoHow do you ‘learn’ leadership? Mostly, it’s taught with platitudes and sayings. But, you really learn how to lead by observing actions of leaders and then putting those actions in play yourself. that’s what we’ll do in this 12-part coaching series. Each month, we’ll introduce a new leadership strategy and ask you, in the 365 Leadership Coaching Club, to implement it. These strategies will grow your business and help you adapt new leadership skills. Watch for more coming soon!

Who’s this for: All managers, general managers, owners, and agent team builders.

kids running and jumping goalsFrom working with dozens of real estate owners and managers, and as my position as a CRB (Certified Real Estate Broker) instructor for twelve years, I’ve had an opportunity to see exactly what makes a company profitable–in the long run. So, this month, I’m sharing what I’ve found to be the critical pieces of the puzzle that lead to sustainable profits. I’ll spotlight the 4 foundations you have to have to be exceptionally profitable–no matter your economic model. Actually, I’ve come to these foundations by observing how companies fail to be profitable over a period of time without these four foundations. In each of these blogs, I’ll spotlight one foundation. The fourth is

Teamwork.

Go It Alone vs. Teamwork

a�?I work alone.a�? a�?I dona��t need to be a member of a a�?teama��a�?. Wea��re heard that for years in the real estate industry. Yet, the strongest, fastest-growing real estate companies have team building as part of their cultures. Agents who want to expand their businesses create teams. So, TEAM is no longer a four-letter word. The importance and implementation of leadership through teamwork and synergy is back in style in the real estate industry.

Why Building a Strong Team is Important to Agents AND Management

As with all industries, the real estate industry is evolving. Wea��ve gone through the a�?go it alonea�� phase. Because wea��ve gotten more sophisticated in business. We realize that no one succeeds alone. We understand now that people working together create something more substantial than the sum of the parts. In addition, with the challenges in the business, we finally get that many minds focused on the same task can accomplish much more than each person working as his own little island. Supporting this trend, strong company cultures have emerged which encourage and reward teamwork instead of solely independent achievement.

Franklin D. Roosevelt said, a�?People acting together as a group can accomplish things which no individual acting alone could ever hope to bring about.a�?

If youa��ve ever played on a sports team, you know the chaos that ensues when every player tries to be the stara��to go her own way. Thata��s not a team. Thata��s a group. You may also know the joy of playing on a team that shares a common focus and commitment to excellence. What a difference! What if you could bring that into your real estate office or your agent team?

In my next blog, I’ll discuss the 4 principles to develop teamwork.

Do you have a team? Or, do you have a group?

Man-Walking-Up-Stairs-to-GlobeWho Helps You Step Up to the Next Level? Who Helps You Create that Team?

As owners and managers, too often we feel like we’re ‘on our own’. Yes, we have the company–if we’re in a franchise–but, who’s really looking out for you? It must be YOU. Yet, few leaders have coaches. At the same time, we urge our agents to get a coach…….if you’re wondering whether coaching is for you, why not investigate our Leadership Mastery Coaching program? It’s true one-on-one coaching–no cookie-cutter or set topic approach, because you’re seasoned, you’re knowledgeable, and you’re unique. Carla Cross is a ‘coach’s coach with a winning background as a turn-around leader. Why not find out more in a Complimentary Consultation? Click here to arrange.

group with ballWhich agents are really your team builders? Is it the agent who produces the most–but doesn’t come into the office–ever? Is it the agent who fixes coffee and is agreeable, but sells only 3 homes a year, in a good year? Hiring and firing is not a a�?black or whitea�� issue. There are many shades of gray. I know. I managed almost two decades. We become friends with our agents. They rely on us. We rely on them. In some cases, we become almost moms and dads to them. It becomes a very dependent environment. No one wants to disrupt it. However, you are running a business–not a social welfare state.

How to Find your real Team Builders

Leta��s recognize that not all the value, or, to some of us, even half the value of our agents is in their ability to close sales. In other words, your top producer may not be your most desired agent. There are other valued assets they bring to the table, like:A�

Uphold the culture

Provide mentoring

Create stability in the office

Team player

Longevity and consistency

What are yours? Write them down. A�(Use 4-6 values).

Now, give each one of these values a possible rating of 0 to 4 (4 being highest). Finally, evaluate each of your agents with each of your important values.A� For example, leta��s say you are evaluating your top producer. In the production value, that producer would get a a�?4a�?. But, leta��s say that top producer isna��t much of a team player, and youa��ve evaluated her as a a�?1a�?. When youa��re through evaluating that agent, add all the numbers to get a cumulative number.

Name Production rating Culture rating Mentoring rating Total
Sally Production/4 Culture/3 Mentoring/3 10
Joe Production/0 Culture/1 Mentoring/0 1

 

Leadership group idea: If you work with a leadership group, ask them to evaluate those in your office youa��re unsure of. You may be amazed!A�

Whata��s Your Agenta��s Real Value to Your Office?A�

Now, you have evaluated each agent on all the values you feel are important to the success of your company. To see how they stack up, make a list of them, starting with the agent who scored the highest cumulative number. This evaluation process will give you a very different picture of who your best producers area��and who your worst office associates are.

Bottom-Line Questions to Ask YourselfA�A�

I know ita��s very difficult to terminate people. In fact, one manager asked me to advise him on how to do a a�?graceful termination.a�� Really, behind termination anxiety lurks these questions. They need to be answered for you, as leader, to take the actions that your good agents are expecting from you:

Can an agent be a noteworthy negative to your reaching your goals?

Can an agent actually provide substantial energy against your culture?

Whata��s Joea��s value to you?

Can this value be quantified in a business sense?

What are you getting personally out of keeping Joe?

A�What are your next actions?

A�Why are you avoiding what you need to do?

Dona��t you deserve more than Joe is giving you?

How does Joe feel now? Does Joe deserve an environment where he can win?

Make a Plan of Action*

It could be to get Joe into production within a certain time period, or help him find a better career fit for himself. It could be to help Joe into that new career right now. Ia��ll bet Joe is just waiting to see what you will do. After all, youa��re the leadera��.

Question: What are you values and how do you weigh them?

man with hand over faceLet’s be honest. Have you ever hired someone and found out it was the ‘hire from hell’? If you haven’t, you just haven’t hired enough agents or staff!A� Many managers tell me that the hardest thing they have to do is to hire staff. I think that’s because most of us never had any training in how to hire staff (or hire agents, for that matter).A�During a 3-day management symposium I taughtA�in South Carolina, and one of my students emailed me: “Can you give me some tips toA� assure I don’t make a hiring mistake with staff? If any of us hasn’t made mistakes hiring staff, please comment! I know I’ve made many–and that’s why I’ve developed the tips here. This tips work for hiring agents or staff. And, they work for agents hiring team members.

So, here are four surefire tipsA� for you.
1. Create the right kind of questions from your job description
Using that job description you created (you did create one, didn’t you?) for your agent or staff position, create past-based questions that tell you if the candidate has the skills and qualities you need. For example. You’re looking for someone who cares about the company. Here’s the question: “In your past jobs, give me 3 examples of how you watched out for the company’s best interests.” Listen and probe. Here’s an example for hiring agents. Let’s say you want an agent who is a ‘self-starter. The question: “Was there a time in your past when you wanted something badly, and you went out and got some kind of job to earn it?”A� Listen and probe.
For more information on behavioral predictors, see The Complete Recruiter and my eBook on interviewing, Your Blueprint for Selecting Winners.
2. Follow a planned, proven interview process to assure you get all the information you need
Most of us don’t interview; we, just sell. We don’t find out the ‘secrets’ about the candidate, but, the candidate sure finds out about us! If you need a proven process, see Your Blueprint for Selecting Winners. I created 8 steps to use each time for a smooth, professional interview.
3. Use a Behavioral Profile
I’d also suggest you use a behavioral profile, for those who pass your first interview. Use it to gather information prior to your second interview. In our coaching company, we use Michael Abelson’s: www.abelson.net. It’s well worth it because you find out things that are very hard to discover in the ‘live’ interview. Then, you go back and ask more past-based questions about those areas. That’s called ‘validating’.
4. Check references “3 deep”
Be sure to check references–not just the ones the candidate gives you, but go ‘3 deep’. That means to ask the people the candidate gives you, ‘Who else could I contact about this candidate’? Go 2 people deep from each of the names the candidate gives you. That way, you’re sure to get a better, less biased picture of the candidate. You’ll find you learn a lot from people who weren’t ‘direct references’!
Now, you have those four surefire tips to avoid staff hiring mistakes. Let me know how they work for you!How’s Professional is Your Interview Process?

eBook Cover(2)You work so hard to gain those interviews. But, do you have planned interview process that assures you pick winners? (And assures the candidates are impressed with you….) Your Blueprint for Selecting Winners, with new information about what desired agents of today are looking for, is a guide to create your unique attractors, how to put together a powerful presentation, and a completely new video showing exactly how to craft the best ‘crystal ball’ type of questions. Learn more here.A�