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Archive for standards

How much time should you spend in these management activities I’ve listed in the handout below?

This month, I’m featuring blogs regarding going into management. Why? I’ve been interviewing for that next great leader. Unfortunately, I’ve found few candidates have prepared at all for management. (Read my earlier blogs for preparation needed).

In my Leadership Mastery Coaching program, I provide several analysis tools to help new managers get started right with the best practices. At the end of this blog, grab my Time Analysis for Managers. Use this to set up your schedule (if you’re going into management). If you’re already in management or managing managers, use this to help managers get their priorities right for success.

Where Managers Go Right–and Wrong

In my most popular book, Up and Running in 30 Days, the new agent’s start-up plan, I divide all the activities an agent could do into two categories: business producing or business supporting. Business producing are those activities where the agent is finding, working with, and closing clients. Business supporting are all the rest of the activities. Where do you think agents go wrong? They spend too much time in business-supporting activities.

Now, let’s compare that to the categories and activities managers do. They also divide themselves nicely into busininess-producing and business supporting. (Take a look at my handout at the end of this blog).

How do You Spend Your Time?

From working with hundreds of managers in my Leadership Mastery program, I see that successful managers spend the majority of their time in business producing activities. The failing managers spend most of their time in business supporting activities. In fact, they become masters of the technical aspects of the business, and spend lots of time preparing and playing technology. (Sound familiar to those of you managing failing agents?) There’s nothing wrong with knowing the technical aspects of real estate and using technology. But, the failing manager focuses and ‘lives’ there.

What’s Your Conclusion?

Let me know how you used this analysis tool. General managers: What did you find when you had a manager use this tool? What changes will you help them make?

Grab my Time Analysis for Managers. Use this to set up your schedule (if you’re going into management). If you’re already in management or managing managers, use this to help managers get their priorities right for success.

Resources (Some are FREE) to Gain those Management Skills

This month, I’m offering some of my management resources free with purchase of other resources. Check it out here.

Rate yourself on your management skills, so you’ll know what you need to work on prior to going into management (or if you’re already in management).

Are you thinking of going into management? Few of us knew the skills–or the level of skill attainment–we needed to succeed in the job. I want to help all of you who want to go into management to succeed at a high level. Thus, these blogs.

For the past couple of months, I’ve been interviewing potential managers. I’ve found that almost none had done any ‘prep’ work to go into the position. Yet, successful managers have developed specific, somewhat unique skills to do their jobs. And, what I’ve found is that these skills must be at least partially developed before we launch ourselves into management–or else we get swamped by all these new challenges hitting us in the face!

In an earlier blog, I discussed the skills we need to have honed prior to going into management. In this blog, we’ll tackle getting those skills in certain areas.

At the end of this blog: grab my assessment tool I use in my Leadership Mastery coaching series to help new managers plan for this skill attainment.

The Biggest Skill Area Managers Need Today to Succeed

What do you think it is? It’s recruiting and selecting skill. Why? Because, there’s so much competition for good agents that a manager just can’t sit back and wait for agents to come to them. It isn’t the old days (although I never was able to do that in my ‘old days!’).

These skills are the same skills good agents use to expand their businesses. That’s why we need to hire managers who have been successful recruiters and selectors. Notice I said recruiters and selectors. I know companies brag about how mahy gross recruits they landed that month or year, but, long-term, it’s those who stay, prosper, and grow with the company that add to the profitability of all.

One of the standards you need to create when you’re hiring a manager is

How successful was that agent as a business getter? What’s the number of transactions you would accept?

How to Get Recruiting and Selecting Skills

Your company may have a course focusing on these skills. If so, take it prior to going into management. Overall, the best courses out there for management are the CRB courses, leading to the Certified Real Estate Broker designation. I highly recommend them. Here’s the link.

What’s Your Agent Track Record?

In addition, if you don’t have a track record of at least 12-20 transactions a year as an agent, in my opinion, you have not developed the skills in recruiting and selecting you will need as a successful agent. It’s my experience that agents who didn’t actively lead generate will carry that habit into management. They will balk at lead generating for agents, and they will fight upper management to the death–and to everyone’s detriment.

Resource (Some are FREE) to Gain those Management Skills

This month, I’m offering some of my management resources free with purchase of other resources. Check it out here.

Grab the leadership skill assessment here.

Managers or general managers: If you’re hiring a new manager, help them evaluate their skill levels and then create a training and coaching program to assure they get those skills before they launch their management career.

What? Here are MORE strategies that don’t work anymore.

Florida Realtor just interviewed me for an article on the sales strategies that agents are still using–but that don’t work. I thought that was such a great topic that I want to share them with you here. So, these blogs will each explore 2 habits. This is great for managers to think about, because these habits and strategies can wreck your training–or make it effective!

My first two strategies were no database or contact management and using a ‘love ’em and leave ’em mentality. Now, here are those next two ‘no-no’s.

  1. Not qualifying your buyer or seller

You’d think that agents would learn and use qualifying methods because they’re always challenged by ‘time management’. But, no. For some reason, many agents still believe that any client is a good client. So, they waste hundreds of hours either hauling non-buyers around–or listing properties that won’t sell. Even in this hot market! I know, this market is generally very forgiving. But, it always won’t be that way!

Managers: How are you teaching your agents to qualify buyers and sellers? Do you have them role play their qualifying procedures? Do you have them identify knockout factors and establish standards for working with buyers and sellers?  (If you want great ‘courses’ for these things, check out Your Complete Buyer’s Agent Toolkit and Your Complete Power Listing System. They’re resources with all the background and documents agents need to do great qualifying interviews. And, they’ll provide you comprehensive courses in those subjects, too).

2.  Not using a visual presentation for buyers and sellers

This goes with #1. I separated them, though, because both need to happen so the agents fully informs the client and finds out if the client is ‘for real’.

 And, most people are visual learners. Finally, agents (and generally salespeople) are not deemed the most trustworthy people on the planet (just perception, not truth!). Usually visual substantiation and 3rd party endorsements and statistics add immeasuable credibility.

Managers: Do you work with your agents to create visual presentations with real substantiation for their claims (like, ‘our listings sell faster’). Do you help each agent create their personalized presentations to spotlight that agent, or do you rely on general company overviews (won’t work anymore!).

Resources: If you want great ‘courses’ for these things, check out Your Complete Buyer’s Agent Toolkit and Your Complete Power Listing System. They’re resources with all the background and documents and visual presentations agents need to do great qualifying interviews. And, they’ll provide you comprehensive courses in those subjects, too).

What do you think are habits and strategies that agents are still using that just won’t propel them forward in today’s competitive environment?

 

hands of keysWhat does my piano teacher have to do with real estate coaching–or training? Everything. Here’s what I learned about coaching great performance–not from a business coach, but from my great piano teacher (in fact, I’ve had many of them.)

As you know, some pianists become great, while most others just become good enough to play the notes. It’s the same with trainers’ outcomes. Last week, one of my coaching clients (an owner of a real estate company) asked me, “Why do some trainers and coaches get great results and others don’t–but seem to be working as hard?”

Great question, huh? In fact, if we trainer/coach types knew that answer, we could build our systems so that we assured great performance! So, I went back to my ‘former life’–that as a musician and piano/flute teacher, and thought, “Why do some piano teachers create great performers–and others don’t?”

Why Use Piano Teachers as the Analogy….

I use the analogy of the piano teacher, because it’s easy to hear differences in sloppy and great performance. I’m sure you’ve heard 2 people play the same piece of music. One plays it accurately and one just kind of slops through it. Or, some piano teachers’ students drop out, unmotivated to practice, while others stay motivated, challenged, and achieve high performance–even if they don’t seem to have great talent.

Five Proven Components for Great Performance

From having taken piano lessons since age six, gaining a degree in piano performance, and having taught piano at the grade, high school, and college level, I’ve had an opportunity to see the great and the not-so-great–both teachers and performers. Here are the five components I’ve discovered make the biggest difference in great performance. As you read this, ask yourself, “How am I, as a trainer and/or coach, applying these principles?” “What outcomes am I getting?”

1. Great piano teachers screen in and screen out.

They don’t let just anybody take lessons from them. Trainers and coaches: What’s your ‘screen in’ process? Do you have one? Do you have a list of questions you ask? In our coaching company, we have a prescribed list of questions we ask potential clients (and we unfortunately have to turn down some). I even have a Coach ability Assessment I provide potential clients.

Click here to request your copy.

2. Great piano teachers set expected standards (minimums) during the screening process–not after the lessons start!

Those standards include: Amount of practice each day, recitals attended and played in, going to lessons, etc. What do you expect of your clients? Make a list of at least 5 standards now–and get the ‘mutual expectations’ agreement in writing prior to letting them into your program.

3. Great piano teachers figure out the ‘competency levels’ they want their students to attain–and when they expect them.

How good do you expect your students to get in that one-month training program you’ve been doing? Do you even measure skill levels? Which skill levels to you measure? How? Do you have your students practice their listing presentations until they reach the level of competency you believe the real client expects? What an eye-opener! Make a list now of 5 skills and the level of competency you want your students to attain in your training program. You’ll see your outcomes go way up just by doing this.

4. Great piano teachers get better performance because their excellent students motivate other good students to excellence.

Have you ever gotten yourself into the situation where you felt like you were way above the other people in your group? This isn’t an ego thing–it’s just a ‘I don’t belong here’ thing. Likes attract. Good performers motivate other good performers. Excellent performers stay. Are you creating a self-motivating group–or, are you creating a situation where your good performers will leave for a team that is ‘more like them’? This goes back to those ‘screen in’ and setting competency principles. I know we all feel challenged when people don’t appear motivated. Here’s one of the secrets to fire them up!

5. Great piano teachers provide lavish praise–when deserved.

Behavior that’s rewarded is repeated.

If you have competency levels, you have a way and a reason to praise. Your students/clients know when they have reached those levels–and can expect praise, too! In fact, strong students/clients will ask you for praise. Write down the 5-10 methods you use to appreciate and praise good performance. If you can’t get to 10, figure them out.

But, what about the method? The specific coaching, the training? Yes, the method is important, but the coaching/training techniques above are much more important. I’ve heard some great performers and some poor performers all playing the same kind of music from the same method. At the same time, great methods should have some ‘built-in’ features that assure the trainer/coach is achieving these 5 principles.

Principles, System, Coaching–Putting it All Together

From talking with prominent trainers, managers, and coaches, we’ve pinpointed a need for all those training and coaching today to get the coaching they need to turn out great performers. A�In my online coaching program for new agents, logoUp and Running in Real Estate, I’ve put these components into the program as a integral way to assure great performance.

man on groundThis month, I’m featuring the lifeblood of a real estate office–hiring AND firing.

No one wants to talk about it, but, the passive-aggressive method of just letting them die isn’t leadership–it’s cowardice! Instead, we need to develop a fair method of letting those go who need to go.

Everyone has a Joe (or Josephine) in their offices. Joe has been an agent for six years. He’s the guy who makes coffee every morning. He’s the guy who takes people’s open houses (although he never picks up a customer). He’s even the guy who steps in when someone in the office can’t make their floor time (but he has never converted an inquiry to a client…). He’s also the guy who doesn’t sell a stick of real estate. Woops. I misspoke. He did sell one home once. It was during the ‘on fire’ market. Joe was on floor time. He got a walk in: A buyer who found the home himself, had cash, and was willing to write it up at Joe’s convenience. (After closing, Joe didn’t follow up with the client again. After all, the sale is over, isn’t it?)

What’s the matter with just keeping Joe?

Nothing, if you don’t care about your bottom line. Brokers tell me that a poor hire or a non-productive agent costs them nothing. Unfortunately, that’s far from the case. In this article, we’ll just beat up poor Joe. In the next article, we’ll address the new agent – poor hire.

dollar markHere’s How Joe Costs You $$$$$–Lots of $$$$$$

If you read nothing else in this article, please read this line:

Joe is a walking billboard for failure-an effective marketing strategy that communicates your office’s failure to make him successful, and your failure to making him successful.

Joe’s “billboard” publicizes the outcomes from your recruiting, training, and coaching. Here they are.

Recruiting. You find it hard to recruit. See, likes attract. People see that Joe (or lots of Joes) are in your office. Agents do search the MLS to find out what the sales statistics are in offices. (Why would they go to an office that has low production?) Maybe you’re like me, taking over a real estate office where it was known in the area, literally, as “the place you went if you didn’t want to work.” Boy, what a great recruiting endorsement!A� If so, you know that it’s a terrific uphill battle to recruit good people into a bad office. (Hint: You must get rid of the bad people first, then build on a new foundation. You can’t fool those agents!).

Training. You’re finding it hard to get agents to attend your training classes. Why? Because Joe attends every one of them-and then doesn’t take any action. So, your class endorsement is actually “those classes don’t do any good.”

Coaching. People say they want help, but they won’t go into a coaching relationship with you. Why? Because Joe tells them it won’t do any good. After all, he’s been in your office for five years, and being with you certainly hasn’t done him any good. (Joe also rains on the newer agents’ parades, by convincing them that no lead generating method you endorse is worth their time. After all, the one home Joe sold was a walk-in.)

Joe’s Making Your Success an Uphill Battle

You’ve tried to help Joe. You’ve decided you can’t help him. You’re working harder and longer. Yet, your office culture and productivity just don’t seem to improve. Ask yourself:

What percent of “Joe’s” do you have in your office right now?

Carla’s rule: If you have over 10% seasoned non-producers, you aren’t leading. They are.

In my next blog, I’ll show you a different way of evaluating your agents. It will give you a method you can trust to figure out who to keep and who to put the ‘happy trails’ record on for…..

small LM CoverAre you Unsure of Who to Hire and Who to Fire?

Why not see if Leadership Mastery Coaching can help you gain the skills and judgments to make great personnel decisions? This is a unique, one-on-one coaching program expressly for real estate leadership. Sign up for a complimentary consultation today. Make 2016 the year you break through your ceiling of achievement!

coaching hand upFrom working with dozens of real estate owners and managers, and as my position as a CRB (Certified Real Estate Broker) instructor for twelve years, I’ve had an opportunity to see exactly what makes a company profitable–in the long run. So, this month, I’m sharing what I’ve found to be the critical pieces of the puzzle that lead to sustainable profits. I’ll spotlight the 4 foundations you have to have to be exceptionally profitable–no matter your economic model. Actually, I’ve come to these foundations by observing how companies fail to be profitable over a period of time without these four foundations. In each of these blogs, I’ll spotlight one foundation. The first is

Vision–do you know where you want to end up, and have you communicated it and gotten the team on board?

The second,A� is standards. Do you know what you’ll put up with–and what you won’t? Do you have production standards (the minimum someone can do and stay with you….)

If you don’t have those foundations, you aren’t leading. You’re just managing. And, in a fast market, you can get away with that. But, if market conditions aren’t sweeping your office forward, you need to step up to these 4 leadership foundations.

The Third foundation: Accountability

You can have vision and standards, plus goals–but, if you don’t hold yourself and others accountable to them, nothing changes.

You’ve heard all this before (or you’ve said it): a�?I dona��t need a coacha�?. a�?Ia��m accountable to myselfa�?. And, you should be. But, none of us are able to move forward and break through those barriers to achievement at times–without a coach to be accountable to. How do I know that? As a long-time professional musician, I know that we need someone to show us around our barriers. We need someone to help us set those goals AND move toward them.A� No great performer ever is so naA?ve to believe he can coach himself. You just can’t see what you’re missing! Look what happened to Michelle Khan, the ice skater, when she decided she could coach herself? A downward spiral, which resulted in lowered self-confidence and self-esteem. It was a long climb back for her, too.

Deadlines to Get it Done

The biggest plus of having a coach is that the coach sets deadlines with you for accountability. The second biggest plus is that the agent/client gets the positive reinforcement all motivational studies show is absolutely critical for higher goal attainment. If you want your agents to produce more, hold them accountable for that production. The third plus is that the coach offers suggestions in how to get there and reinforces what he/she knows will work. So many times, I’ve thought intuitively that a particular strategy was right. But, I gave it up because it wasn’t reinforced by a coach (or by anyone). And, it takes a long time to see your efforts work (just think about recruiting!).

Your Biggest Value to Your Agents

What do you think it is? It’s not things. It’s actually invaluable. It’s what you can do to help them develop the best career they can have. And, that is through coaching and accountability.

How do You Learn How to Coach?

Be coached by the right coach–a coach who has proven that specific leadership/action strategies will work for you. It’s important not to get just platitudes or encouragement, but to get practical actions that are proven to move a company forward.A� If you don’t have a coach now, you’re telling your agents to be accountable–but you’re not. So, consider gaining a coach this year to help you put these foundations in place.

LM CoverAre You Developing your Leadership Skills?

If you’re stuck in management and want to move to leadership, if you want to expand your office with a firm foundation for long-term profits, consider coaching. Sign up for a complimentary consultation to see if Leadership Mastery Coaching is for you.

hands of keysFrom working with dozens of real estate owners and managers, and as my position as a CRB (Certified Real Estate Broker) instructor for twelve years, I’ve had an opportunity to see exactly what makes a company profitable–in the long run. So, this month, I’m going to share what I’ve found to be the critical pieces of the puzzle that lead to sustainable profits. I’ll spotlight the 4 foundations you have to have to be exceptionally profitable–no matter your economic model. Actually, I’ve come to these foundations by observing how companies fail to be profitable over a period of time without these four foundations. In each of these blogs, I’ll spotlight one foundation. The first was

Vision: The Missing Component in Most Business Plans (and in most real estate offices!)

The second, which I’m spotlighting today, is standards.

How did I learn about the importance of standards? As a lifelong pianist, I learned from a very early age that I had to play up and beyond a certain standard to get into master groups, to get a great piano teacher, to win competitions, and to be awarded a degree in piano performance. Standards are simply a part of the competitive action-based environment (like real estate sales!).

What are Standards?

What are standards? Ita��s the least youa��ll put up with. You may call them ‘minimums’. Now, some real estate offices have standards/expectations like

1. You must take floor time

2. You must be a Realtor

3. You must wear clean clothes and drive a clean car.

Those are all nice. But, have you ever seen a failing agent take floor time? Be a Realtor? Of course. Too often, we establish standards of behavior for our convenience as managers–not to assure we have productive agents!

The most important standards to put in place are

production standards

I Don’t Need Standards: My Economic Model is Different

You may say, “I don’t have to have production standards. I’m a desk fee company.” Sure, that works fine when the market is good. But, what happens to all those fees when the market turns down? You bet. Your desk fees shrink and your non-collectible fees go up dramatically! Or, you’re a high agent count company with narrow profit margins. Sure, that’s fine too as long as the market carries you. But, if you’re finding it hard to recruit great people, or if your market turns down, you’re in the same boat as the desk fees.

The bottom line: Having productive agents is important to your long-term profitability, no matter your economic model.

Standards Establish What You’re Like as a Company

Describe your agents. What are they like? Would you describe them as productive professionals? Are they doing enough transactions apiece that the public thinks your company is serving the public well? Or, do you have a majority of low-producing part-timers–which, even though we don’t want to admit it, tarnish our company image.

How many sales and listings sold are expected to stay in your office? If you don’t know, neither do they! So how can you expect them to go to work, when work is whatever theya��d like to do that daya��real estate sales or not! Before you can expect your training or coaching to work, you must establish productivity standards. Armed with those standards, you and they know whata��s expected. Now, you have a baseline from which to coach. Your consumer also has a baseline of expectations from your company.

Standards Establish Pride in Belonging

Which organizations are you proud to belong to? Why? Do you think your agents are proud to belong to your company? If so, why? Standards say ‘you’re special’. Standards say that you believe you can develop that agent to his/her fullest potential. If you don’t have established, held-to production standards, you aren’t protecting your long-term profitability.

In my next blog, I’ll discuss the third foundation you need to create a profit foundation that won’t waver even when the market tanks–and it will again!

LM CoverDo You Know the Steps to Implementing Standards?

Many times we avoid setting standards because we are either afraid to, or don’t know how to do it in a way that brings all the agents with you. In our one-on-one customized Leadership Mastery Coaching, Carla takes you through the steps and helps you implement standards so you have confidence in the process and the agents are pleased you’re taking leadership. Find out more with a complimentary consultation.

question mark collage

I’ve designated July as my ‘Coach Appreciation Month’. Thanks to all you awesome coaches who help raise the standards of the industry.

Which should you use: Coaching, mentoring, or consulting? Browse any real estate industry publication and youa��ll likely find articles about sales coaching, consulting or mentoring. These terms, often used synonymously, denote different methodologies for the professional development of sales associates. But which method is appropriate for each of your agents?

Choosing the Right Program for the Person

A mentoring program is ideal for agents who have mastered the basics of working with buyers and sellersa��not agents who are performing below minimum production standards (i.e., new agents). In contrast, a coaching program with tight structure is appropriate for newer agentsa��or agents who are performing under your standards. Finally, a consultant serves as a a�?sounding boarda�? for more experienced agents and leads them through the process of self-discovery.

New Agents Need More Than Mentors

The use of mentors with brand-new sales associates erroneously results from their urgent need to have someone available to answer all of their questions, all the time. Mentoring, when used with new agents, often means they learn about knowledge as opposed to skills. New agents get smart intellectually and attend many classes. But the problem is, the mentees may not go out and actually sell real estate. Their natural tendency is to want more and more information, without putting that knowledge into action. New agents think that information will make them confident, when, in fact, ita��s the practicing of skills that will make them confident. So, mentoring is most appropriate when coupled with a strong, structured coaching program.

Coaching to a Specific Game Plan

Coaching assists new, inexperienced agents get into action by following a specific game plan. If youa��re going to be a coach, the No. 1 priority is to have a specific and accurate game plan. Selling real estate requires a series of skill sets and a series of activities that are linear. The game plan has to include what to do and why to do it. (See Up and Running in Real Estate for an example). A�Avoid turning your coaching sessions into a�?how to do ita�� (thata��s training, and exposes that you dona��t have adequate training to support your coaching programa��..)

What Should Happen in your Coaching Session

During a coaching session, for example, broker/owners need to ask agents, a�?Did you do the actions we agreed on you last week?a�? A direct approach is needed because youa��re teaching agents job priorities. If they did complete their assignments, then listen to their accounting of them. If they didna��t, immediately stop the session.

Why Are You Trying to Motivate a�?In-Actiona��?

But brokers or managers usually dona��t quit here. Instead, they try to motivate agents by asking why they didna��t complete their assignments. Thata��s not appropriate in coaching; therea��s no coaching without agent action and accountability. Dona��t try to motivate. Repeat the assignment: Call 50 people in your area and ask them about buying or selling properties. Tell new agents the a�?whya�� behind this activity.a�? Another mistake coaches make when the agent doesna��t do the work is that they fill the time by answering the agenta��s a�?Ia��ve always wondereda�� or a�?if it ever happensa�� questions, like, a�?If I ever sold a home, which purchase and sale agreement form would I use?a�? Make a a�?deala�� with new agents. When theya��ve completed their assignments as promised, youa��ll answer these types of questions.

Are You Coaching to Get the Agent Past your Standards? (Minimum sales expectations)

Critical to coaching new sales associates are mutually acceptable standards. These are minimum expectations (not goals) with attached consequences. Use a coaching accountability contract that includes standards and goals. In such a contract, broker/owners need to define what they want sales associates to accomplish, what the minimum requirements are, and what will happen when sales associates are under/at/over those minimum requirements. Then you are in agreement.

Your Coaching Checklist

For your new agents: Do you have

  • An accountability contract you have signed during the interview process?
  • A� A coaching discussion with a would-be client that includes standards and goals and consequences?
  • A� A game plan that precisely sets out priorities, actions, and accountability?
  • A� A training program that trains a�?howa�� to do each of the actions in the coaching program?

What do you need to a�?shore upa�� to create that effective coaching program?

Mgrs UpRun CoverThank You, Coaches–FREE Resource for You

To thank all you coaches out there, I’m GIVING AWAY my $99 resource, Managers’ Coaching Companion to Up and Running in 30 Days. Why? It was created to partner with the 3rd edition of Up and Running in 30 Days. Now, the 4th edition is published (and a new ‘delivery’ of my coaching help is available at Up and Running in Real Estate). The coaching companion I’m giving away this month still has lots of value. With 109 pages, 2 audio CDs, and 1 ‘document’ CD I’ve packed this resource with dozens of coaching strategies, tips, and questions for coaches to use in ANY coaching situation. Just pay shipping and handling and I’ll get one out to you–while they last. And, thanks, coaches, for your dedication to raising the standards of our industry. Click here for a description and to order.

Agents: Forward this blog to your managers and tell them to take advantage of my offer. They’ll get lots of practical, proven information on productivity coaching (I know, I’ve done these strategies for over 2 decades!).

Want to know more about my one-on-one coaching programs? See our managers’ program, Leadership Mastery.

 

men shaking handsLet’s turn the tables. What should agents do for you and your company? I’m just finishing my new book, What They Don’t Teach You in Pre-License School (out in about a month). I wanted prospective and new agents to know they also have an obligation to their companies (is this a new thought?!). I included the ten things below in my book.

When agents interview, they understandably want to know what the company is going to do for them.A� We managers spend a lot of time creating what we feel are value-added services, and explaining these services.A� In reverse, Do you tell them what your company expects from them? Do you have a ‘mutual expectations’ talk?

Sobering thought: IfA� the company doesn’t expect anything from the agent, how much effort will the company put out to see the agent is successful?

The Ten Things

From working as an agent for 8 years, and managing agents for almost two decades, Ia��ve drawn some conclusions about the a�?turnabouta��s fair playa�� that I believe agents owe managers. Ia��ve also listed these in Up and Running in 30 Days, to give agents a ‘heads up’. I believe if managers are willing to give 100% support through training and coaching each agent to success, agents need to give it their best, too. Here are agentsa�� ten commandments:

  1. Do the work. You know what it is!
  2. Dona��t argue.
  3. Dona��t make excuses for not doing your start-up plan.
  4. Dona��t tell the manager youa��ve been in the business two weeks and you have a better way.
  5. Do thank your manager frequently.
  6. Do tell other agents that you appreciate your managera��s efforts.
  7. Do tell other new agents you meet in other companies that you have a great manager.
  8. Dona��t bug other people in the office to find another answer because you didna��t like your managera��s answer.
  9. Dona��t change the Up and Running plan because you a�?dona��t like ita�?. (You just dona��t like lead generating, do you?)

10. Dona��t miss a coaching appointment!

Ia��d love to hear what you think of my a�?ten commandments.a�� Are there others you think are important? Before you hire an agent, get agreement on what you will do for the agent–and what that agent will do for you!

Getting agreement on what we both expect before deciding to work together is key to a happy partnership. The only surprises I want agents to have after they start are good ones!

logoUp and Running in Real Estate Starts Your AgentA�Right to an Exceptional Career

Congratulations to the 3 winners of the scholarships for my new UP and Running in Real Estate program:

Jeffery Doescher of Apollo Realty in Cocoa Beach, Florida

Stacy Coppola of Coldwell Banker in Castro Valley, California

Bessie Selfridge of Coldwell Banker in Port St Lucie, FL

You can bet they are going to get the secrets of becoming a top producer–and get into action with the most proven business start-up plan in the business!

Do you have newer agents who you know should succeed? Please do them a favor and have they enroll in Up and Running in Real Estate. All the training, coaching, and supporting documents are online, so agents can go at their own speed and go back as many times as they want. How this program is different: It is foundationed with a business start-up plan, so agents learn how to self-manage a successful business, not just do activities. And, there’s nothing else to buy–no extra cards that stay in their trunks! (And, there’s a coaching component for you to support your agent every step of the way!).

Check it out and see how you canA�help your agents can reach their potential–and beyond!

Where did you learn your two best management tips? I learned mine from my eighth grade teacher! If we really think about it, most of our important life lessons were taught us before we even reach our teens. A lot of that learning came from our school experiences (good and bad!). Ia��ll bet you have at least one teacher who made a huge impression on you. Mine was Louise K. Taylor.

On the first day of school, Mrs. Taylor established her management style. She would stand up, walk toward this unruly, somewhat disrespectful group of eighth graders and say, a�?Youa��re probably wondering what the a�?Ka�? stands for?a�? Then, after a pregnant pause, she would scream (and I do mean a�?screama��), a�?Killera�?!

Well, that statement sure tamed us, at least for a short period of time. And, it either scared us into performing at our best, or created a few a�?deer in the headlightsa�� thirteen-year olds who literally stayed paralyzed the whole year.

Mrs. Taylora��s Top Management Tips

1. Mrs. Taylor established expectations. When she yelled that first day of school, she made clear, in her a�?opening statementsa��, she wouldna��t tolerate our not doing the work or failing. These were her standards. But, not only was she frightening us into submission. She was also doing something extremely important for successful management: Implicit in those standards was her promise: She could teach us to succeed at a high level in high school and college. All we had to do was to do the work.

Mrs. Taylor motivated us into action and reinforced those actions with encouragement.
She was proved right again and again. Not only did we thrive in high school and college, the basic English and math skills Mrs. Taylor drilled into us in little ole Lebanon, Oregon, have benefited us through the rest of our lives.

2. Mrs. Taylor had a plan of action to get us past those expectations.

Everything Mrs. Taylor did and taught us was backed up with a specific, proven plan of action. She knew how to structure learning, how to get us to practice perfectly, how to give us feedback, and how to help us set ever higher goals. This couldna��t have happened unless she had

A proven plan that she knew got the outcomes she wanted for us
Her obvious faith in her plan gave us the guts, the determination, the motivation to do the work. We knew that she knew that plan got us results.

Are you communicating that with great confidence to agents?

Tough but fair expectations coupled with a proven agent development plan assures high performance.

It was true in grade school and ita��s still true today! Of course, I dona��t mean for you to yell at your agents or threaten them. But, our best performance always happens when we set high standards and then help others reach them.