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Archive for selection

interview with clip boardDo you know the best question you can ask a candidate? I know. You have your favorite questions. And, this month, I’m going to focus on the selection process. Why? Because we managers have the least training in it, yet more hinges on our skill in this process than any other–maybe except lead generating for recruiting.

What’s your favorite interview question? In the next few blogs, we’ll discuss types of interview questions. Some are great, some are okay–but some are misleading or worthless.

The Category of Question You Should Always Include

Are your favorite questions present or future-based? If so, beware. You’re being misled. I’ll explain more in a future blog. But, for now, I just want to focus on the category of question that assures you get the truth about the candidate: the past-based question. A� That question begins with “In the past, was there a time when you…………………” Why is that type of question so powerful? Because candidates seldom lie about their past when they are posed a question like that. Also, even though this is the best type of question you can ask, few managers are trained to ask a majority of this type of question. In a later blog, I’ll show you more about creating this type of question to find out the quality you’re looking for.

The Question You Want to Ask

Here it is: “When did you get your first job?”

Why is that so powerful? Because it demonstrates the qualities you’re looking for. According to my surveys of thousands of real estate pros, the vast majority of successful real estate pros started working as kids! This shows their ingenuity, belief in themselves, and determination that they alone are in charge of their destinies. Imagine some of the answers you’ll get, and what those answers will tell you:

“I got my first job at age thirteen.”

or

“I just started looking for a job. I’ve been living with my parents. They support me, and I really want to find the right job for me (I’m 27 years old).

What do these answers tell me about the candidate’s likely success in a business that requires self-confidence, ingenuity, tenacity, and ability to do it themselves?

Keep Probing about that Answer

One of the big mistakes we interviewers make is that we jump from question to question before we find out what’s really going on. So, don’t do that! Stay on that same question/answer and probe. Imagine some of the probing questions you can ask about that first answer: “How did you happen to get the job?” “Why did you want a job?” How long did you keep the job?” What did having a job at age 13 teach you?” What will the answers tell you?

Sometimes Our First Job Tells us what We DON”T Want to Do the Rest of our Lives

The reason that I wrote this blog is that I just read an article about Fred Hassan, CEO of Warbug Pincus, a private-equity firm. He said his first job was a produce picker and cannery worker. He said he learned about getting up early and working hard. And, he said it convinced him that he was very lucky to get to go to college and escape manual labor. I had a similar experience. As a 6th grader, I started picking strawberries and beans in our little town of Lebanon, Oregon. It was back-breaking, hard, sweaty work, and I vowed I’d use my brains and my talent to make a living–instead of doing manual labor!

Let me know the answers and insights you get from asking the question, “When did you get your first job?” (Remember to stay on that question and probe, probe, probe!)

eBook Cover(2)Is Your Selection Process really Professional?

Quick. Write down the 9 steps you take through your selection process. Difficult, isn’t it? Most interviewers just wing it, spending most of their time selling the company. Wrong! Find out the 9 steps Carla shows you that keep you in control of the interview–and help you stand out as the exceptional manager that desired candidate wants to work with.

Your A�Blueprint for Selecting Winners is only $79,95, and it’s immediately downloadable. This resource will save you thousands of dollars of hiring mistakes!

Click here for a detailed description.

 

red flagDo you know how much poor hiring practices cost you? Many brokers tell me they don’t cost anything! Most brokers dona��t realize they are doing irreparable damage to their companies by hiring those who arena��t going to go right to worka��and keeping those who wona��t work. Here are the 3 biggest consequences to poor selection I see.

1. Stops you from hiring great producers. Likes attract. How can brokers hope to hire that great producer when they have more than 10% of their office as non-producers? I can see it now. a�?Sure, Ia��ll come to your office. Ia��m a top producer, and I just love to be dragged down by those non-producers. It will be my pleasure to waste my time with them.a�? Not.

2. Kills your recruiting message.
Do you have a training program? Do you use it to recruit? Herea��s the real message: a�?We have a training program. All our new agents go through it. We dona��t get any results from the program, so it really doesna��t work. But, join us.a�? You cana��t possibly show how successful your training program makes your agents because your training program cana��t possibly get resultsa��poor people in and no actions and accountability required.

3. De-motivates your agents to provide referrals to you.
Your outcomes and hiring practices speak more loudly than you could possible speak. Why would one of your good agents possibly refer someone to you when your good agent doesna��t see those you hired starting right out and making money fast?

All Your ‘Recruiting Stories’ Can’t Cover Up the Realities of Poor Hires
In a fast market, a�?accidental salesa�� buoy poor agents and make them look as though they are actually selling enough real estate to be a a�?mediana�� agent. What’s your market like? Can the agents in your market figure out the quality of your agents? Of course. You can run, but you can’t hide!

Please Tell Me What You Think
What do you think a non-productive agent costs the company? In my next blog, Ia��ll give you some line items that will probably double what you think a bad hire costs. Leta��s see what you think first. Poor hiring practices really, really hurts brokersa��both financially and emotionally.

small CompleteRecruiterRecruiting Resources to Help you Recruit Better

Recruiting plans, ideas, strategies, dialogue–Carla Cross has all the resources you need to ramp up your recruiting. See them at carlacross.com.