Got a minute? If you're a busy manager, that's about all you have. That's why Carla Cross, management coach, speaker, and author, has created this blog just for you, with ready-to-use tips to master management through people.

Archive for inspiration

It’s time to do your business plan! So, my next blogs will focus on helping you create that business plan–and getting your agents to plan.

Whata��s your mission? Ita��s time to begin writing your business plan for 2019. In the next few blogs, I want to give you a few tips on creating various parts of your business plan. One of the important, but often-left-out parts of a business plan is your mission statement. What it is? Ita��s literally your mission in your business.

Mission statements answer the questions:

Why are you in this business?
What do you want to accomplish?
How are you going to achieve your mission?
Whata��s important to you?

Why Have a Mission Statement?

To keep yourself on track.
To decide what you will and wona��t do.
To state who you work with (and to think about who you wouldna��t work with).
For time management
For clarity and focus
To use as a springboard to your marketing

Mission statements should be:

a�? Well-defined
a�? Restrictive
a�? Complementary with your company statement (and the company statement should be reflected in any branch office/associate statements)

Mission statements are:

a�? Not lightly changed (usually stay the same through your
yearsa�� business plans)
a�? Written in the present tense
a�? Do not contain objectives or goals
a�? Not tied to time

Mission Statements Are Not Objectives or Goals

Mission statements are not quantifiable. Leave out any numbers a�� they go into your objectives. Following is an example: A person may write, a�?I am a profitable agent. I will make a profit of $50,000 every year.a�? The first part of the statement, a�?I am a profitable agenta�? has a place in a mission statement. But the last part of the statement is an objective, or quantifiable end result, and should be placed in another section of your plan. The mission statement is broader; it guides you as you make long-term decisions. The above offers some valuable tips on writing mission statements.

Mission Statements Arena��t Changed Lightly

Because mission statements are really statements of you as a businessperson, these statements are not lightly changed a�� just as you would not lightly change yourself. That does not mean that you might not work over time on how your statement is constructed, but it does mean that you do not change the essence of the statement, the specialties, the ideals a�� without considerable thought.

Mission Statements a�� In the Present

Statements should be written in the present tense. These statements convey you at your best a�� how you see yourself as a real estate professional. Because you may not have actually attained the picture you have in mind, you may be writing about yourself as you see yourself in the future. To cement that thought in your mind, use present tense verbs as you create your statement.

How to Use your Mission Statement

a�? To reflect back and forth throughout your business plan (Are
your actions congruent with your plan?)
a�? In your officea��framed in your entry
a�? In your marketing materials
a�? In your Professional Portfolio
a�? In your pre-first visiting listing and buyer packages
a�? In your email signatures
a�? On your website

Mission statements first clarify for you whata��s important, your focus, and your limitations. Then, they help consumers choose you. Use the parameters above to create your mission statement.

Grab My Online Business Planning Program–at Discounts!

Thought you’d get it done but it’s still on your ‘to do’ list? I want to help! So, I’ve adding a discount on my online business planning resources through Dec. 31.

Managers: Frustrated because you can’t get your agents to plan? Problems solved! I’ve put my exclusive planning pages online–plus webinars to help you get through that plan fast. Don’t wait another year for business success. See more here.

Special discounts through Dec. 31: Purchase the agent’s planning resource, Beyond the Basics of Business Planning for agents,  and save $20 (regularly $99). Use coupon code agent bus plan.

Managers: I’ll teach your agents how to plan, too! Included in your Manager’s Package!

Purchase the manager’s planning resource, Beyond the Basics of Business Planning for Managers,  with all office/company planning documents and save $50. Use coupon code manager bus plan.

Offer ends Dec. 31: Big discounts on these programs–use the coupon codes below to order.

Ready to order? Click below:

Beyond the Basics of Business planning for Managers — regularly $249, now $199 with coupon code manager bus plan 

Beyond the Basics of Business Planning for Agents  –regularly $99, now $79 with coupon code agent bus plan

Remember, this special offer expires Dec. 31, so, order now and get your business plan ready for 2019.

 

Here’s more from Mr. Rogers–on how to use your talents and skills to contribute.

In my earlier blog, I discussed what we can learn from Mr. Rogers. Here’s more.  I’ve been thinking about his legacy, because there’s a new movie about his philosophies: “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”

First, who was “Mr. Rogers”? Best known from his children’s show, which ran from 1968 to 2000, Fred Rogers was so much more—a minister, a musician with a degree in music composition, and chief puppeteer of his show. I’ve always enjoyed his quotes, because many of them are from his experiences as a musician (as am I).

From What We Do to What We Can Contribute

I don’t know about you, but I got bored selling real estate after about 5 years. All those split levels started looking the same! So, let’s say you’ve mastered what you do (and maybe have become bored with the routine of your life!). Then, what do you do? How about doing like Mr. Rogers did: Shine your light and talents outward to influence others in positive ways.

Note to managers, trainers, and coaches: Do an exercise where each person names a talent/skill they have. Then, have their partner ‘translate’ how that skill can be translated to others. Example: “People tend to tell me their secrets and their fears.” Partner: How about gaining some coaching expertise and start coaching to help people?

Let me know what you come up with. I’ve found that it’s easier for someone else to be creative about your talents and skills that it is for you to be! Here’s to a very fulfilling, rich, and contributive year!

Let Me Help You Help Your Newer Agents!

I want YOU to be the hero here! So many times, I’ve talked with managers who want to design training and coaching programs to help their agents. But, I know, from experience, it takes thousands of hours and test marketing to create effective, results-based training. So, why not let me do the heavy lifting and you coach to the program? Check out Up and Running in Real Estate, my online training, coaching, and accountability plan with an amazing, results-centered business start-up plan. You (and I) will be helping more people faster! Check it out here.

 

Managers: You motivate others. Who gets you up when you’re down? That’s a really important question for us managers. Why? Because we’re expected to be the ‘cheerleaders’ for our associates. So, if we’re down, we can bring everyone down.

Have you ever gotten poison oak? In Oregon’s Willamette Valley, where I grew up, poison ivy seemed to be waiting in the woods ready to attack me each time I ventured out of my yard. Getting poison ivy meant itchy skin, at the least, and, at its worst, it meant a face swollen to the point where my eyes were just slits. That will get you down. In fact, I’d look in the mirror and wonder if I’d ever look like meA� again.

During one particularly horrible bout with my enemy, poison oakA� (you can tell I really hated this stuff), I remember riding in the car with my mother to pick up my sister at school. (I couldn’t go to school with the poison oak raging, but I was probably driving my mother so crazy that she let me take this little trip). We got near the school, and I forgot I had this grotesquely swollen face for a moment. I waved at a friend. I got a stare back. Turning to my mom, I asked, “Will I ever get over this?” Of course, as good moms do, she replied, “Of course, sweetie. It’s just temporary. You’ll look like your cheery little self real soon again.” And, of course, after a couple of weeks, I did resemble me. (But I still hated poison oak…)

What do you do when your mom’s not there?

We managers have many varieties of poison oak waiting to attack us as we venture into the ‘woods of management’ each day. An agent leaves us, a call from an unhappy seller, a letter from a new homeowner, saying, “What is your company going to do about our pest infestation problem?” I’ll bet you can think of 25 others! Sometimes you wish your mom could just sit with you in your office each day and say, over and over, “It’s okay, honey. They don’t dislike you, they just have a problem.” Sounds far fetched, but, the real question is, “Who gets you up when you’re down?”

An Industry-wide Problem

It’s not just us brokers who seem to be fighting more ‘poison oak’ every day. It’s all of us in the industry. As agents capture more of the commission dollars, they’re more ‘on their own’. They’re fighting more of their own battles, with less management help. There’s less ‘broker supervision’. Now, to independent people like you and me, that sounds great. We don’t need someone standing over our shoulder telling us what to do. But, there’s a downside to no supervision. When we do something right, there’s no one to congratulate us! And, since most of us in this industry thrive on recognition, we’ve given up a chance to get it from an ‘authority’.

The biggest desire of a human being is simply recognition.A�

On the other hand, when things go wrong, with less interest and guidance in how we’re doing, we’ve given up the chance to let someone who cares about us ‘pump us up’ when we’re down.

How do you respond to barriers? How quickly can you bounce back? Tell me your strategies and share them with our readers.

Let Me Motivate Your Agents While I Train Them

As a manager, do you have a lot on your plate? I know. I managed for over 2 decades! Why not let me train and coach your agents, while I motivate them to high goals? Check out my online training/coaching/accountability program, Up and Running in Real Estate. Along with 25+ training webinars and dozens of checklists/documents to guide your agents, I’ve also built in lots of motivation and accountability. Check this unique program out here.A�

bus plan 6Do your agents have mission statements as part of their business plans?A�Why is having a mission important? How should it guide agents? You’ve heard the talks about finding your passion. But, you see your agents being over-whelmed in their careers. It’s just too much to think big when they’re A�just trying to find that house or convince a buyer to work with them!

This month, I’m featuring tips on business planning in both my blogs (see also my blog for agents Up and Running in 30 Days.)

The Importance of Your Mission

This time of year, we’re encouraging everyone to create their business plans. One of the first things you’ll do in creating your own business plan is to define your mission. Why? Because, otherwise, you don’t know whether or not the actions you decide to take will fulfill your mission. This is also true of your agents.

Tackling and Bringing Down your Time Management Challenges

If agents have been in the sales business a little while,A�they’ve already discovered thatA�their biggest challenge isA�time management.A�A�HowA�can theyA�get done in a business day everything that needs getting done? That’s where your mission comes in. Creating your mission helps youA�prioritizeA�all the things you’re supposed to do. It helps you decide whatA�notA�to do. Most important, it helps you figure out

how to put YOU into your management and sales business successfully

Want more business planning help?A�I’ll be doing a webinar Dec. 6 at 4 PM Pacific Time. It’s complimentary, and I’ll even give you ‘assignments’ to get you going on a great 2018 plan.

Plan_Act_CelebrateMore from Carla Cross on Business Planninga��free Webinar

Listen/look at the free webinarA�I’m doing Dec. 6 (you pick the best date for you and invite all your agents!). Click here for more information and registration.

Managers: I’ll get your agents started on their plans with 4 assignments, and give you tips on how to assure all your agents get great plans!

girl with inspiration sayingsYou know how much you’ve learned as an agent–and how much more you have learned as a manager. I’ve had those learning experiences. Plus, boy have I learned a lot as a CRB (Certified Real Estate Brokerage) instructor and coach. So, this month, I’m going to share what I’ve found to be the critical pieces of the puzzle that lead to sustainable profits. I’ll spotlight the 4 foundations you have to have to be exceptionally profitable. Actually, I’ve come to these foundations by observing how companies fail to be profitable over a period of time without these four foundations. In each of these blogs, I’ll spotlight one foundation. The first is

Vision: The Missing Component in Most Business Plans (and in most real estate offices!)

Is your business plan missing the inspiration? (If you have a business plan at all…..) If so, you need to put in the a�?visiona�� component of your plan. What is a�?visiona��? According to Jerry Porras and Jim Collins, authors of the great business book Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies, vision

Provides guidance about what core to preserve and what future to progress toward.

In other words, you must first know your ideology and core values before you can create the rest of your direction in your business plan. The lack of vision in a plan leads to a de-motivating and certainly uninspiring plan. (As you can imagine, numbers dona��t in themselves inspire. They only inform. Martin Luther King didna��t say a�?I have a business plan. He said a�?I have a dreama��.)

For you managers: I think helping your associates create an inspiring and motivating plan will remove their reticence at doing a plan.

Shared Vision in a Company Also Leads to More $$$$

Collins and Porras studied very successful companies to find out the differences between a�?stunninga�� (high profits and highly regarded), and other like companies who were almost as profitable, but not so successful). They published the results in the best business book Ia��ve ever read, and I mentioned above, Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies.

What did they find was the common difference between the highly profitable and merely very successful?

A common vision and values shared by every person in the company.

Porras and Collins’ conclusion was that the desire for profits isna��t the main driver for profits. The focused and tenacious vision, shared by all in the company, was the biggest determinant for profits.

Components of Vision

Your vision is made up of your core ideology and your envisioned future.
Your core ideology is made up of your core values and core purpose. If you look at your life, youa��ll see that the things that inspire and motivate you are the things that adhere to your belief system. Thata��s what this part of the vision statement says about you.
Your envisioned future is made from a vivid description of this future, and BHAGsa��big hairy, audacious goals. Those are goals five years out, that you really dona��t think you can attain.

The Power of BHAGs

Surprisingly, as Porras and Collins found, when companies stated these goals, they actually attained them in three years! (Inspirational goals that are congruent with your core values and core ideology are powerful motivators!).

Creating your Vision

Click here to get my worksheet to create your vision.

Ia��m convinced that we reach or dona��t reach our goals based on the intensity of our desire, driven not by cold numbers, but by the warm emotion of aligned values and inspiring goals. Yogi Berra said it well:

Life is like baseball; ita��s 95% mental and the other half is physical.

Include the a�?Drivea�� and Drive Your Company

When we know the a�?whya�� of what wea��re doing, wea��re driven by our own motivations. Put the vision into your business plan and see your motivation soar, and your goals met next year. And, don’t forget to communicate it every day to your team in various ways.

In my next blog, I’ll reveal the 2nd foundation–the one which forms the ‘put your money where your mouth is’ –from vision to proof.

LM CoverWho Helps You Step Up to the Next Level?

As owners and managers, too often we feel like we’re ‘on our own’. Yes, we have the company–if we’re in a franchise–but, who’s really looking out for you? It must be YOU. Yet, few leaders have coaches. At the same time, we urge our agents to get a coach…….if you’re wondering whether coaching is for you, why not investigate our Leadership Mastery Coaching program? It’s true one-on-one coaching–no cookie-cutter or set topic approach, because you’re seasoned, you’re knowledgeable, and you’re unique. Carla Cross is a ‘coach’s coach with a winning background as a turn-around leader. Why not find out more in a Complimentary Consultation? Click here to arrange.

In November and December, I’m be featuring business planning. Suggest to your agents they check out Up and Running in 30 Days, my blog for achieving agents. I’ll provide lots of planning tips and free documents.

In an earlier blog, we discussed why most business plans fail to inspire. I named 3 components of a real business plan that put the inspiration and motivation into a business plan: Vision, Review, and Mission. In this blog, we’ll discuss the first component–vision.A�

Is your business plan missing vision?A�Below is an explanation of why having a vision is so important to the success of your business plan. In fact, I believe the lack of vision in a plan leads to a demotivating and certainly uninspiring plan.

For you managers: I think helping your agents create an inspiring and motivating plan will remove their reticence at doing a plan.A�

Why Vision is ImportantA�

A few years ago, business professors, Jim Collins and Jerry Porras, studied very successful companies to find out the differences between a�?stunninga�� (high profits and highly regarded), and other like companies who were almost as profitable, but not so successful). They published the results in the best business book Ia��ve ever read, Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies.A�

A�What did they find was the common difference between the highly profitable and merely very successful?A�A�

A common vision and values shared by every person in the company.A�A�

A�Porras and Collins’ conclusion was that the desire for profits isna��t the main driver for profits. The focused and tenacious vision, shared by all in the company, was the biggest determinant for profits.A�A�

Components of VisionA�A�A�

Your vision is made up of your core ideology and your envisioned future.A�A�

As you can see from the chart on the right, excerpted from my business planning system, your core ideology is made up of your core values and core purpose. If you look at your life, youa��ll see that the things that inspire and motivate you are the things that adhere to your belief system. Thata��s what this part of the vision statement says about you.

A�Your envisioned future is made from a vivid description of this future, and BHAGsa��big hairy, audacious goals. Those are goals five years out, that you really dona��t think you can attain.A�

A�The Power of BHAGsA�A�

Surprisingly, as Porras and Collins found, when companies stated these goals, they actually attained them in three years! (Inspirational goals that are congruent with your core values and core ideology are powerful motivators!).A�A�

What Vision Does for CompaniesA�A�

Herea��s Porras and Collinsa��s function of a vision statement:A�A�

Provides guidance about what core to preserve and what future to progress toward.A� Made up of core ideology and envisioned future.A�A�A�

Here’s an example of a vision of one of the book’s stand-out companies:A�

Our basic principles have endured intact since our founders conceived them.A� We distinguish between core values and practices; the core values dona��t change, but the practices might.A� Wea��ve also remained clear that profit a�� as important as it is a�� is not why the Hewlett-Packard Company exists; it exists for more fundamental reasons.a�?

-A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A� John Young, former CEO, Hewlett-Packard

A�How to Construct your VisionA�

A�How do you want to see yourself in this business? How do you want people to talk about you and your business after you retire? What values are most important to you? What ideology do you follow in your business?A�

Managersa�� exercise.A� To figure out what your core values are, imagine that you are opening an office on Mars. You can only take three agents with you on your spaceship. Name those three agents. What are the core values of these agents? Who in your office doesn’t exhibit those values? Why is he/she still with you?A�

Looking back: Imagine you are at your own memorial, watching from above. What are others saying about you? Whata��s most memorable about you?A�A�

Voicing those BHAGsA�

What is a great goal you would love to accomplish in your business, but really dona��t feel ita��s possible for you within five years? Write it right now.A�A�

Why We Dona��t Reach Those Lofty GoalsA�A�

Is that goal thata��s been eluding you congruent with your core values? What I mean by that is, does that goal feel comfortable to you? For instance, if that goal is that youa��ll make two million dollars, and you dona��t like the feeling of that much money, because your values are aligned differently, you just arena��t going to reach that goal. That, I believe is the reason many of us dona��t reach some of our goals. Those goals arena��t in alignment with our core values.A�A�

A�Herea��s what great motivational speaker Zig Ziglar said about goal-value alignment:A�A�

You cana��t consistently perform in a manner that is inconsistent with the way you see yourself.A�

A�Fnding your Alive, Powerful MotivationA�A�

In my business planning system, I also provide another method to check your motivation.A�A�

Click here to get this document.A�A�

Ia��m convinced that we reach or dona��t reach our goals based on the intensity of our desire, driven not by cold numbers, but by the warm emotion of aligned values and inspiring goals. Yogi Berra said it well:A�A�

Life is like baseball; ita��s 95% mental and the other half is physical.

Want to see more on business planning? Check out my online programA�Beyond the Basics of Business Planning. All the instructional webinars and documents are online, and very easy to complete and implement. This is a program created exclusively for real estate owners and managers. And, when you purchase the manager’s package, you also get access to all the agent’s planning videos and documents.

Complimentary Business Planning Webinars

I’ve recorded 2 webinars for you to help you get inspired to plan for next year–and to give you information on what I believe are the biggest success strategies for the coming year. One webinar is for agents and one is for leadership.

Click here to view them.

For many managers, the idea of contests is a great one. They like to think they will motivate their associates and ‘pump them up. But, it usually doesn’t work that way. Have you tried a contest and found out it fell flat?

A�This short video will tell you why most contests actually demotivate (and lead to lack of retention), and how to assure your contest works.

A�

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What have you learned about taking part or organizing a contest? How have they worked for you?

What’s your “Inspiration Quotient”? Often, we managers/trainers/coaches completely underestimate our power to inspire. Recently, IA�read an article in our local newspaperA�that demonstrates just how strong that power can be.

How a Homeless Girl Got to Harvard

Khadijah Williamsa��s mother was last spotted living in a storage unit in Los Angeles. But, Khadijah isna��t living there. Shea��s on her way to Harvard. What an improbablea��yet inspiringa��story. For as long as she can remember, she and her family, consisting of her mother, and her sister, have drifted from one homeless shelter to another. Yet, shea��s still not drifting. And, shea��s not just graduating from high school, or getting an entry-level job, or going to a community college, shea��s actually enrolled in Harvard. (Dona��t get me wrong. Ita��s a terrific feat to go from homeless to a job, or to graduate from anything. But, Harvard?…..)

What aspects of Khadijah Williamsa��s life caused her to veer off the homeless, dependent path and toward higher education? What role did her mentors play?

Inspiration, Tenacity, Belief: A Homeless Girl’s Lessons

Here are the powerfulA�motivators that greatly and positively influenced this future Harvard grad’s life.

1. Be aware of the power of your words
Someone told Khadijah she was smart. In the third grade, she scored in the 99th percentile on a state exam. Her teachers told her she was gifted, and put her in special programsa��even though her schooling was intermittenta��and she moved schools constantly. What do you tell people? Do you pick out their strengths and help them accentuate them?

2. Help them believe in their unique talents and skills
Khadijah believed in herself because she believed what her teachers told her about herselfa��the positive. Can you think of someone in your life that believed in you more than you believed in yourself at the time?

3. Give them the encouragement/inspiration from mentors
Khadijah realized she couldna��t do it herself, and sought out organizations and mentors. When is the last time you encouraged someone to take a risk?

4. Help them keep on keeping on. Never give up
Fueled by her belief in herself and the faith others had in her, Khadijah developed unbelievable tenacity to put herself into programs, stay in school, and ignored the taunts of the other students (youa��re homeless, you cana��t do this, etc., etc., etc.)

5. Help them create a better environment
Even though her mother and sister continue to live the homeless lifestyle, Khadijah has never blamed her relatives or her environment.

Yes. Ita��s a challenging business. But, you have skills the agents are hungry for. From these five points above, you can see the absolute power of the mentor. You have the ability to change people’s lives for the better!

Who/what inspires you? Let me know who and what inspires you and why by putting a comment on either of my blogs on this subject (1-2 paragraphs, please). Simply write a comment on the blog, telling me who and/or what inspires you.

Managersa�� tip: Why not do this as an exercise with your agents? Youa��ll inspire them and re-light the fires of desire so theya��ll be eager and enthusiastic to do what needs to be done to get back into the action.

Note: Through November and December, I’m going to help youA�with your 2012 business plans. You’ll find free documents from my business planning system for ownersA�and an invitation to a complimentary webinar. Why not subscribe and be sure not to miss a thing?A�

In an earlier blog, we discussed why most busienss plans fail to inspire. I named 3 components of a real business plan that put the inspiration and motivation into a business plan: Vision, Review, and Mission. In this blog, we’ll discuss the first component–vision.A�

Is your business plan missing vision?A�Below is an explanation of why having a vision is so important to the success of your business plan. In fact, I believe the lack of vision in a plan leads to a demotivating and certainly uninspiring plan.

For you managers: I think helping your agents create an inspiring and motivating plan will remove their reticence at doing a plan.A�

Why Vision is ImportantA�

A few years ago, business professors, Jim Collins and Jerry Porras, studied very successful companies to find out the differences between a�?stunninga�� (high profits and highly regarded), and other like companies who were almost as profitable, but not so successful). They published the results in the best business book Ia��ve ever read, Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies.A�

A�What did they find was the common difference between the highly profitable and merely very successful?A�A�

A common vision and values shared by every person in the company.A�A�

A�Porras and Collins’ conclusion was that the desire for profits isna��t the main driver for profits. The focused and tenacious vision, shared by all in the company, was the biggest determinant for profits.A�A�

Components of VisionA�A�A�

Your vision is made up of your core ideology and your envisioned future.A�A�

As you can see from the chart on the right, excerpted from my business planning system, your core ideology is made up of your core values and core purpose. If you look at your life, youa��ll see that the things that inspire and motivate you are the things that adhere to your belief system. Thata��s what this part of the vision statement says about you.

A�Your envisioned future is made from a vivid description of this future, and BHAGsa��big hairy, audacious goals. Those are goals five years out, that you really dona��t think you can attain.A�

A�The Power of BHAGsA�A�

Surprisingly, as Porras and Collins found, when companies stated these goals, they actually attained them in three years! (Inspirational goals that are congruent with your core values and core ideology are powerful motivators!).A�A�

What Vision Does for CompaniesA�A�

Herea��s Porras and Collinsa��s function of a vision statement:A�A�

Provides guidance about what core to preserve and what future to progress toward.A� Made up of core ideology and envisioned future.A�A�A�

Here’s an example of a vision of one of the book’s stand-out companies:A�

Our basic principles have endured intact since our founders conceived them.A� We distinguish between core values and practices; the core values dona��t change, but the practices might.A� Wea��ve also remained clear that profit a�� as important as it is a�� is not why the Hewlett-Packard Company exists; it exists for more fundamental reasons.a�?

-A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A� John Young, former CEO, Hewlett-Packard

A�How to Construct your VisionA�

A�How do you want to see yourself in this business? How do you want people to talk about you and your business after you retire? What values are most important to you? What ideology do you follow in your business?A�

Managersa�� exercise.A� To figure out what your core values are, imagine that you are opening an office on Mars. You can only take three agents with you on your spaceship. Name those three agents. What are the core values of these agents? Who in your office doesn’t exhibit those values? Why is he/she still with you?A�

Looking back: Imagine you are at your own memorial, watching from above. What are others saying about you? Whata��s most memorable about you?A�A�

Voicing those BHAGsA�

What is a great goal you would love to accomplish in your business, but really dona��t feel ita��s possible for you within five years? Write it right now.A�A�

Why We Dona��t Reach Those Lofty GoalsA�A�

Is that goal thata��s been eluding you congruent with your core values? What I mean by that is, does that goal feel comfortable to you? For instance, if that goal is that youa��ll make two million dollars, and you dona��t like the feeling of that much money, because your values are aligned differently, you just arena��t going to reach that goal. That, I believe is the reason many of us dona��t reach some of our goals. Those goals arena��t in alignment with our core values.A�A�

A�Herea��s what great motivational speaker Zig Ziglar said about goal-value alignment:A�A�

You cana��t consistently perform in a manner that is inconsistent with the way you see yourself.A�

A�Fnding your Alive, Powerful MotivationA�A�

In my business planning system, I also provide another method to check your motivation.A�A�

Click here to get this document.A�A�

Ia��m convinced that we reach or dona��t reach our goals based on the intensity of our desire, driven not by cold numbers, but by the warm emotion of aligned values and inspiring goals. Yogi Berra said it well:A�A�

Life is like baseball; ita��s 95% mental and the other half is physical.

Substantial Savings

Want the whole planning system at a substantial savings? In November, I’m knocking $25 off the regular price ($99.95)A�for the leader’s planning system, Business Planning for the Owner, Manager, and Team Builder. With dozens of tips on business planning, and all the customized planning pages you’ll need, this system is a treasure trove of how to run your business more profitably.A� I also coach you on 2 audio CDs, to give you insights into planning strategically.

Click here to find out more.

 

 

 

Note: Through November and December, I’m going to help youA�with your 2012 business plans. You’ll find free documents from my business planning system for ownersA�and an invitation to a complimentary webinar. Why not subscribe and be sure not to miss a thing?

Leta��s get real. Your agentsA�arena��t motivated to build that business plan–and we aren’t either. We know wea��re supposed to write business plans. Yet, if your agents areA�like 95% of real estate professionals, doing that seems just like an exercise in futility. Most business plans don’t inspire.

Leaving out the ‘Magic’?

There are components left out of most plansa��components that put the inspiration and motivation into your plan and your agents’ plans. I’ll give you specific guidance for you to put that magic into businessA�plans, so you and your agents are inspired every daya��not only to complete the plan, but to use it as a very personalized and specific guide to your success.

A�A�Why Are Most Business Plans Useless?A�

Unfortunately, when most people write business plans, all they do is fill in some blanks with a�?guess numbersa��. The problem here is that numbers in blanks arena��t inspiring. They arena��t motivating. They dona��t call out and suggest to you that you should look at those numbers once in awhile!

A�What Really Motivates Us?A�

If numbers inspired us, wea��d all be gazillionaires selling real estate. After all, we say we want to sell more homes than the average agent. We want to make more money than the average agent. You know the drill, and Ia��ve heard it from hundreds of agents hundreds of times. Yet, if numbers and money were motivators, our results would be different than they are.A� The fact is that money, in itself, is not a motivator. Ita��sA�

what we want to do with the moneyA�

And thata��s as individual as we are. Martin Luther King didna��t say, a�?I have a business plan.a�? He said, a�?I have a dreama�?. You must include the a�?dreama�� part of your future in your business plans to make that plan useful to you. That means, you as a business consultant, need to include the three ‘missing’ parts of business plans that I describe below.

A�Building the a�?Whya�� Into your Business PlansA�

Thata��s the motivator. In other words, we have to have a big a�?whya��. Most business plans dona��t build in the a�?whya��. Thata��s why they fall flat, and leave us cold. Thata��s why agents dona��t want to go through the exercise of creating them. Managers always commiserate that they cana��t get their agents to write business plans. You wouldna��t want to write a plan, either, if you know it wouldna��t help you with your business the next year.

The Tools to Find that a�?Whya��A�

Most people think of business plans as projections of numbers. But, thata��s not all there is to a real strategic plan. There are three parts of a business plan that provide that inspiration, that motivation, and that a�?whya��. And, those are the parts of the planning process that are most frequently left out:A�

  1. Your visiona��why youa��re in this business; how you see yourself after you retire
  2. Your reviewa��what happened in your business that will make an impact on your business in the future
  3. Your missiona��who are you in the business

A�In the next few blogs, I’ll show you how to create these parts of your business plan and get your agents to plan, so you give yourself the inspiration and motivation you need to create and implement your plan.

A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A�A� Substantial Savings

Want the whole planning system at a substantial savings? In November, I’m knocking $25 off the regular price ($99.95)A�for the leader’s planning system, Business Planning for the Owner, Manager, and Team Builder. With dozens of tips on business planning, and all the customized planning pages you’ll need, this system is a treasure trove of how to run your business more profitably.A� I also coach you on 2 audio CDs, to give you insights into planning strategically.

Click here to find out more.