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Got a minute? If you're a busy manager, that's about all you have. That's why Carla Cross, management coach, speaker, and author, has created this blog just for you, with ready-to-use tips to master management through people.

Archive for course writing

A for objection busterThis month, I’m spotlighting training.

What grade would you give your new agent training? An A–or a D? How valuable is your new agent training to your agents’ success ? I don’t mean, did they like it, or did they like the instructor…. You’ve been in the business awhile. I want to know how valuable you think your agents found it to launching their real estate careers.

I’ve done surveys to managers and to newer agents about the value of their new agent training. I found a great disparity between what the managers thought, and what the new agents thought—six months after the training. So, I’m gathering information from the source—you and newer agents—to find out what you found valuable, and what you wish you had included in training.

Here are some things to think about and answer–as an agent (you can survey your agents, too):

  1. How well did your training prepare you to give effective listing and buyer presentations?
  2. How could it have prepared you better?
  3. How well did your training prepare you to answer buyer and seller objections?
  4. How well did your training prepare you with visual buyer and seller systems so you appeared to be a ‘seasoned agent’ to compete with the best?
  5. How well did your training prepare you with the self-confidence to work with difficult buyers and sellers?
  6. What did you want your training to do for you—before you entered that training?
  7. After having been in the business awhile, what do you wish you had experienced during the training?
  8. Did your training lay out a business start-up plan, and did it train and hold you accountable to that plan until you got results?
  9. Did your training require you to demonstrate enough competency that you could effectively work with buyers and sellers?
  10. How well did your training prepare you to write and negotiate purchase and sale agreements?
  11. How well did your training prepare you to gain loyalty and buyer agency agreements?

What Else?

Please comment on the positives and negatives of your training, so I can better help managers and trainers prepare newer agents for the ever challenging markets and sophisticated buyers and sellers. Thank you!

Do You Do Evaluations After Each Day of the Course–and at the End of the Course?

If you don’t, you’re not learning the truth about your training. Do good evaluations and find out what’s going on. Don’t settle for doing training just to have training!

cropped UltimateREtrainersGuide_front(3)Is Your Training as Good as It Could Be?

If your training isn’t turning out winners, you need a new approach. Get dozens of training ideas and strategies in this unique guide. Learn more here.

blue ribbonsHow many of these 10 high pay-off tips do you have in your training now?

I’ve designated June my ‘Trainer Appreciation Month’, so all my blogs spotlight training. Thanks, trainers!

Too many times we provide training because it helps us attract people to our company. That’s getting only a partial benefit! If you apply the 10 tips for training below, you will see your training pay off in increased productivity, lessened expenses, and much higher customer satisfaction and retention levels. 

1. Clarify what you want the student to do—during class, and after class. (These are your training objectives. They help you create focus and stay on track–and not to go over your desired time frames! See more in The Ultimate Real Estate Trainer’s Guide).

2. How well do you expect the student to do that activity? Establish competency levels. (Do you want them to be able to limp through a listing presentation, or do a masterful job?)

3. Make training a process, not an event. It takes 6-8 times of hearing something to begin to retain it! (Do you ‘dump the whole load’ because it’s faster and easier, or are you concerned with real learning?)

4. Space your training for “spaced repetition”. Skills can’t be learned in one marathon session. If your objective is to develop skills, you must create layered, spaced, repetitious workshops.

5. There must be rest and reflection between practices. Scientists have proven that skills are not retained unless there is at least 4 hours between skill-developing sessions. (Do you provide time for this within your training sessions?)

6. If it’s skills training, three quarters of the time in class should be practice—not teacher lecture.

7. Culturize as you train. The training should be from your point of view, your method of action, and your opportunity to create a strong culture within your training modules. (Is your culture built in, or have you copied trainings from other ‘training gurus’?)

8. Get feedback from the skills training in your meetings. It reinforces the skills and encourages others to take part. Take your skills to a higher level with additional masterminding.

9. Use a facilitation approach, not a lecture approach. Instead of delivering the information via lecture during class, have the students read articles, interview beforehand, listen to audios, etc. (Are you using other ‘delivery methods’ instead of just old boring lecture?”

10. Build in accountability. The student should be highly accountable for practicing the skills and for competency learning. (Do you have accountability as part of your training sessions?”

How many of these 10 high pay-off training tips are you already using? What do you need to change or incorporate to make your training pay off in real, measurable results?

slide one

 A Free Resource to Help You

I’ve just finished a 5-part series on using other teaching methods instead of that old, boring lecture too many of us have relied upon.  Take a look at my uTube channel and watch your training results soar!

 

teacher at boardAre you standing in front of your students to create better performance, or more knowledge? If you are want to train, it’s very important to clarify for yourself exactly what your role is. Why? Because it will determine the outcomes you get.

I learned this the hard way. After graduating in piano performance, I applied to and had been awarded a scholarship to UCLA as a graduate assistant in the music department. But, after I was at UCLA a few weeks, I became disillusioned, for I found out that the UCLA music department was all about ‘knowledge’, not performance. Professors earned tenure by publishing papers about sixteenth century Elizabethan madrigals–but they didn’t have to be able to play the madrigals…My interest and experience in music had been performance.

Are You After Better Performance or More Knowledge?

I’ve never forgotten that lesson about the difference in the knowledge about something–and the performance of it. Which is more important in what you’re teaching? What do you want your students to be able to do as a result of your presentation/training? Sure, just like musical performance, you must have some technique to perform. But, also like musical performance, lots of knowledge doesn’t make you a good performer.

If You Want Better Performers…..

Here are five areas to look at to assure you’re creating performers, not just know-it alls.

1. What percent of your program is instructor focused? That is, the instructor performs. If it’s more than 50%, you have a knowledge-heavy program. Model your program like the piano teacher teaches piano. He talks very little, demonstrates some, and listens to the student play and gives positive reinforcement and re-direction. The teacher knows he taught because the student can play.

2. Do you choose your instructors based on their knowledge and their ability to deliver the message attractively? Start choosing your instructors, instead, on their ability to facilitate performance. They should be able to demonstrate a role play, set up a role play, and draw conclusions. Like great piano teachers create increasingly difficult programs for their students, your instructors should be able to craft ever-increasing difficult rule plays. Think of them like creators of ‘virtual reality’.

3. Who is held accountable for the program–the instructors or the students? In most programs, we ‘relieve’ the instructor if he doesn’t get good reviews from the students. The instructor’s the only one accountable. Turn it around. 75% of the accountability should be on the students to demonstrate they have learned the skill. Why? Because, without student accountability, managers get your ‘graduates’ who can’t perform.

4. Is your focus on curriculum? Are you attempting to create value for the program to management or owners by providing more information than the other school? Most training programs could cut 50% of their curriculum and graduate better performers. Instead of focusing on curriculum, create your program as ‘virtual reality’. Have a system that provides a series of “performance building blocks”. Don’t tell them all about playing a concerto. Just tell them enough to let them ‘get their fingers on the keys’.

5. Are the objectives of your program knowledge-based? How do the students graduate from your program? Do they pass a written exam? Managers want a graduate who can perform the activities of a real estate salesperson to reasonably high performance standards. A good training program should identify, teach, observe, and coach performance in several critical performance areas until the student can perform well enough to graduate.

The Right Performance ‘Test’

As a piano performance major, each term, I had to play a ‘mini-recital’ in the music auditorium for an audience of four–all piano professors. I couldn’t just talk about music theory, or answer a multiple choice exam. I had to play. And, to pass the ‘course’, I had to play to certain set performance standards.  The more your training program resembles the ‘virtual reality’ of your specific performance, the more valuable your program to the people who hired your students –and you.

 SSS_coverExpert Guidance to Write that Great Course!

If you’re serious about writing that great course, this is the resource for you. Step by step, Carla Cross, who has written courses for Re/Max, Better Homes and Gardens, Keller Williams Realty, GMAC, Royal LePage, and CRB, shows you exactly how to create your course and your outline. And, for those Washington state instructors, she shares tips on how to get your course approved for clock hours.

This resource is digital. You will get access immediately.

Introductory bonus: Keys to a Killer Introduction

Includes:

2 instructional videos
Templates to use as guides for course creation
Examples of courses
2 ‘cheat sheets’ to write your course modules
Guidance in how to get your course approved in Washington state.

With 95 pages, this resource, along with the 2 instructional videos, shows you exactly how to create a course that has substance, sizzle, and ‘sell’!

Thank you for a wonderful class on writing a course. This practice and hands on class has given me the confidence and tools I need to move forward with my course curriculum. I feel I have been given a business race car and I can move forward towards my dream of training agents across the country.  Mary Lee, former head of training for Windermere Real Estate, Spokane, Wa.

Introductory price:  $149   Click here for more information and to order. You’ll get immediate access to the 95-page resource guide and 2 instructional videos.

 

 

bigideaI just made a new resource on how to write a course. Why? Because I found that so many courses were just ‘streams of consciousness’. They have lots of information, but they are not in a course format. So, I decided to write a guide to take people right through how to get the course written. Here’s an excerpt from that resource.

What, Why, Who, When, Where, What’s Next

The first thing you should do when you decide to write a course is to answer these six ‘W’ questions.

1. What course do you want to create?

Focus and define exactly the course you want to teach.  Too many courses are too broad. They don’t have a focus. Here’s your chance to zero in on what you really want to accomplish.

Do you see this course as an overview?     An introduction?  Comprehensive?    A series?

2. Why?  Your compelling reason(s) to create this course

Warning: a compelling reason is not that you want people to know or understand things. That’s nice, but it doesn’t go far enough. What challenges or problems will be solved by your attendees as they finish this course?

3. Who is this course for?

Define your audience. Zero in on exactly who they are, their experience and expertise, and other defining attributes about them

Ask yourself: What is their level of learning in your topic right now?

Who would not benefit from your course?

Do you need to narrow your scope for this course?

4. Where (type of delivery)

That is, will this course be delivered ‘live’, via webinar, audio, video, or a combination?

5. When? How long do you think your course needs to be?

 6. What’s next? A series? Can or should you put your course into 2 or more sections?

Remember the rule of learning: spaced repetition provides much better learning.

SSS_coverExpert Guidance to Write that Great Course!

If you’re serious about writing that great course, this is the resource for you. Step by step, Carla Cross, who has written courses for Re/Max, Better Homes and Gardens, Keller Williams Realty, GMAC, Royal LePage, and CRB, shows you exactly how to create your course and your outline. And, for those Washington state instructors, she shares tips on how to get your course approved for clock hours.

This resource is digital. You will get access immediately.

Introductory bonus: Keys to a Killer Introduction

Includes:

2 instructional videos
Templates to use as guides for course creation
Examples of courses
2 ‘cheat sheets’ to write your course modules
Guidance in how to get your course approved in Washington state.

With 95 pages, this resource, along with the 2 instructional videos, shows you exactly how to create a course that has substance, sizzle, and ‘sell’!

Thank you for a wonderful class on writing a course. This practice and hands on class has given me the confidence and tools I need to move forward with my course curriculum. I feel I have been given a business race car and I can move forward towards my dream of training agents across the country.  Mary Lee, former head of training for Windermere Real Estate, Spokane, Wa.

Introductory price:  $149   Click here for more information and to order. You’ll get immediate access to the 95-page resource guide and 2 instructional videos.

 

 

assignmentTrainers: What do your students do AFTER they leave your class? Wouldn’t it be great if they immediately put your ideas and skills to work?Unfortunately, too many attendees don’t know how to do that. Instead, they take notes on what you say! Flattering, but not very action-oriented….

How do you help your students translate what you communicate, plus the experiences they have in class, to real life? Include an action plan in your outline. Including this step increases your adult learner’s desire and ability to create practical action steps to implementing the concepts and skills you are teaching.

Adult learners many times don’t have the skills to translate the concepts you’re teaching to ‘real life’. Using the Action Plan process teaches them to learn better.

How and When to Use the Action Plan

First, put the action plan ‘template’ toward the beginning of your outline. Introduce it, and suggest your attendees use it to capture action ideas. I sometimes ask the attendees to take it out of their outline so it will be handy for them anytime they get an idea.

Put In some Reflection Time

Do you use a method to ‘stop, look, and listen’ in your courses—a kind of natural ‘pause’—to help people apply your concepts, ideas, and exercises to real life? Be sure to put a summary at the end of each of your sections, and give your attendees time to reflect on what they’ve learned–and how they will put it into action.

Now, armed with their action plans and your course summaries, your attendees will have a much better chance of taking home that learning!

Expert Guidance to Write that Great Course!

SSS_coverIf you’re serious about writing that great course, this is the resource for you. Step by step, Carla Cross, who has written courses for Re/Max, Better Homes and Gardens, Keller Williams Realty, GMAC, Royal LePage, and CRB, shows you exactly how to create your course and your outline. And, for those Washington state instructors, she shares tips on how to get your course approved for clock hours.

By the way, this resource includes an action plan template for you, too.

This resource is digital. You will get access immediately.

Introductory bonus: Keys to a Killer Introduction

Includes:

2 instructional videos
Templates to use as guides for course creation
Examples of courses
2 ‘cheat sheets’ to write your course modules
Guidance in how to get your course approved in Washington state.

With 95 pages, this resource, along with the 2 instructional videos, shows you exactly how to create a course that has substance, sizzle, and ‘sell’!

Thank you for a wonderful class on writing a course. This practice and hands on class has given me the confidence and tools I need to move forward with my course curriculum. I feel I have been given a business race car and I can move forward towards my dream of training agents across the country.  Mary Lee, former head of training for Windermere Real Estate, Spokane, Wa.

Introductory price:  $149   Click here for more information and to order. You’ll get immediate access to the 95-page resource guide and 2 instructional videos.

 

 

trainerTrainers: Here are some tips on how to gain focus on that great course you want to create–that course that’s been bouncing around in your head for years! In my next few blogs, I’m going to give you some specific tips to make your course truly ‘teachable’. Why? From teaching for over 2 decades, I’ve found many courses are not actually very ‘teachable’. In fact, they are either

1) Streams of consciousness

or

2) Information dump

If you’ve picked up someone else’s  ‘course’, and tried to teach it, I’ll bet you know what I mean. Unfortunately, too many times, courses are written from an ‘information organization’ perspective, not a teaching perspective. In fact, because so many instructors have expressed frustration, I’ve just finished a resource on how to write a course.

Gaining Focus for your Course

Let’s look at the 6 W’s that you should answer before starting to create your course: The What, Why, Who, When, Where, What’s Next of your course, so you can clarify what you want to accomplish and gain focus. As I give you these, take time to answer each of these questions.

 What course do you want to create?

Take a moment and write exactly what is in my mind (and heart) about this course. Ask yourself, “Is this actually a course”? Or, is it your desire to persuade people to your point of view? That’s certainly okay in a course, but not as a whole course. Instead, you have a ‘persuasive presentation’. Sometimes we want to impart our beliefs to people or make them ‘be’ in some way, but that’s not a course. (Be responsible, be customer-service oriented, etc.) Now, it’s true that can be one of the objectives of a course, but, just getting in front of people and telling them how they should be won’t make it as a course!

Do you see this course as an overview?     An introduction?  Comprehensive?    A series?

Why?  What are your compelling reason(s) to create this course? Be sure it’s not just all about you….

Who is this course for?  What segment of the population do you want to address? One of the mistakes we make is not narrowing our focus to the level of expertise of our desired target audience.

What is their level of learning in your topic right now?

Who would not benefit from your course?

Do you need to narrow your scope for this course?

Where (type of delivery)

Is this course ‘live’? Is it distance learning? Will it be given as a webinar? Your decisions will direct you to the delivery methods (how you will teach).

Armed with the answers to the 6 W’s, you can gain a laser focus for your course, and go to the next step of course creation.

Expert Guidance to Write that Great Course!

SSS_coverIf you’re serious about writing that great course, this is the resource for you. Step by step, Carla Cross, who has written courses for Re/Max, Better Homes and Gardens, Keller Williams Realty, GMAC, Royal LePage, and CRB, shows you exactly how to create your course and your outline. And, for those Washington state instructors, she shares tips on how to get your course approved for clock hours.

This resource is digital. You will get access immediately.

Introductory bonus: Keys to a Killer Introduction

Includes:

2 instructional videos
Templates to use as guides for course creation
Examples of courses
2 ‘cheat sheets’ to write your course modules
Guidance in how to get your course approved in Washington state.

With 95 pages, this resource, along with the 2 instructional videos, shows you exactly how to create a course that has substance, sizzle, and ‘sell’!

Thank you for a wonderful class on writing a course. This practice and hands on class has given me the confidence and tools I need to move forward with my course curriculum. I feel I have been given a business race car and I can move forward towards my dream of training agents across the country.  Mary Lee, former head of training for Windermere Real Estate, Spokane, Wa.

Introductory price:  $149   Click here for more information and to order. You’ll get immediate access to the 95-page resource guide and 2 instructional videos.

 

 

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